Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 08/11/2017
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TIOTAL
Àr-a-mach Inbhir Ghòrdain (1 de 2)
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_SYDATKINSON_01
ÀITE
Inbhir Ghòrdain
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS: Ros Cuithne
DEIT
1991
LINN
1990an
CRUTHADAIR
Syd Atkinson
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Rèidio Linne Mhoireibh
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
1791
KEYWORDS
àr-a-mach
stailcean
claistinneach

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B' ann anns an t-Sultain 1931 a bha Àr-a-mach Inbhir Ghòrdain. B' e àr-a-mach dreuchdail a bh' ann a ghabh seòladairean a' Chabhlaich Rìoghail an aghaidh gearraidhean tuarsatail a bha an riaghaltas a' dèanamh; b' i seo aon dhen na beagan stailcean nam feachdan ann an eachdraidh Bhreatainn. Anns an earrann labhairt seo, tha Syd Atkinson ag innse mun àr-a-mach. Chaidh an earrann seo a thogail bhon t-sreath 'Recollections' aig Moray Firth Radio a chaidh a chraoladh ann an 1991.

'The whole fleet were up in Invergordon waiting to start their annual summer exercises. There were some big ships up there; there was the 'Hood', and the 'Rodney' and the 'Valiant', the 'Malaya' and the 'Warspite'. And there were four light cruisers and a flotilla of destroyers and various ancillary ships, all lying off Invergordon waiting to do this exercise. Soon after they got there some of the ratings discovered that the government were proposing to cut their pay by about twenty-five per cent. Of course, it was the time of the Great Depression and the government were in severe difficulties, economically speaking, and they cut a lot of the public servants' wages but none of them to the extent of twenty-five per cent. Now rightly or wrongly, the men jumped to the conclusion that the announcement had been held back deliberately until they were away from their home ports, just so that they wouldn't have their families and friends to help them in making protests about these cuts.

On the Sunday, the 13th September that was, there was a crowd of them on the pier in the evening and various speeches were made and they called a massed meeting of ratings for the Monday. Now this meeting was held in the naval canteen and it overflowed it to such an extent they had to hold another meeting on the naval football field and there were over five hundred men from various ships on the football field. The result of the meetings was that they passed a resolution protesting against the severity of the paycuts and stating that they wouldn't go to sea until their case had been heard. Now, the ships had been intended to sail on the exercises on the Tuesday but the men stuck to their guns. To all intents and purposes they declared a strike. Well, they continued to carry out all the usual cleaning duties and such like that you would carry out in port; they just wouldn't carry out any duties that would take them to sea. All leave was of course cancelled and that prevented the men from reassembling and having another meeting ashore, but there were meetings held on some of the ships and the men passed their spare time singing songs and cheering and counter-cheering one another on the various ships lying at anchor off Invergordon'

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Àr-a-mach Inbhir Ghòrdain (1 de 2)

ROS: Ros Cuithne

1990an

àr-a-mach; stailcean; claistinneach

Rèidio Linne Mhoireibh

MFR: Invergordon Mutiny

B' ann anns an t-Sultain 1931 a bha Àr-a-mach Inbhir Ghòrdain. B' e àr-a-mach dreuchdail a bh' ann a ghabh seòladairean a' Chabhlaich Rìoghail an aghaidh gearraidhean tuarsatail a bha an riaghaltas a' dèanamh; b' i seo aon dhen na beagan stailcean nam feachdan ann an eachdraidh Bhreatainn. Anns an earrann labhairt seo, tha Syd Atkinson ag innse mun àr-a-mach. Chaidh an earrann seo a thogail bhon t-sreath 'Recollections' aig Moray Firth Radio a chaidh a chraoladh ann an 1991.<br /> <br /> 'The whole fleet were up in Invergordon waiting to start their annual summer exercises. There were some big ships up there; there was the 'Hood', and the 'Rodney' and the 'Valiant', the 'Malaya' and the 'Warspite'. And there were four light cruisers and a flotilla of destroyers and various ancillary ships, all lying off Invergordon waiting to do this exercise. Soon after they got there some of the ratings discovered that the government were proposing to cut their pay by about twenty-five per cent. Of course, it was the time of the Great Depression and the government were in severe difficulties, economically speaking, and they cut a lot of the public servants' wages but none of them to the extent of twenty-five per cent. Now rightly or wrongly, the men jumped to the conclusion that the announcement had been held back deliberately until they were away from their home ports, just so that they wouldn't have their families and friends to help them in making protests about these cuts. <br /> <br /> On the Sunday, the 13th September that was, there was a crowd of them on the pier in the evening and various speeches were made and they called a massed meeting of ratings for the Monday. Now this meeting was held in the naval canteen and it overflowed it to such an extent they had to hold another meeting on the naval football field and there were over five hundred men from various ships on the football field. The result of the meetings was that they passed a resolution protesting against the severity of the paycuts and stating that they wouldn't go to sea until their case had been heard. Now, the ships had been intended to sail on the exercises on the Tuesday but the men stuck to their guns. To all intents and purposes they declared a strike. Well, they continued to carry out all the usual cleaning duties and such like that you would carry out in port; they just wouldn't carry out any duties that would take them to sea. All leave was of course cancelled and that prevented the men from reassembling and having another meeting ashore, but there were meetings held on some of the ships and the men passed their spare time singing songs and cheering and counter-cheering one another on the various ships lying at anchor off Invergordon'