Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 08/11/2017
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TIOTAL
Àr-a-mach Inbhir Ghòrdain (2 de 2)
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_SYDATKINSON_02
ÀITE
Inbhir Ghòrdain
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS: Ros Cuithne
DEIT
1991
LINN
1990an
CRUTHADAIR
Syd Atkinson
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Rèidio Linne Mhoireibh
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
1792
KEYWORDS
àr-a-mach
stailcean
claistinneach

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B' ann anns an t-Sultain 1931 a bha Àr-a-mach Inbhir Ghòrdain. B' e àr-a-mach dreuchdail a bh' ann a ghabh seòladairean a' Chabhlaich Rìoghail an aghaidh gearraidhean tuarsatail a bha an riaghaltas a' dèanamh; b' i seo aon dhen na beagan stailcean nam feachdan ann an eachdraidh Bhreatainn. Anns an earrann labhairt seo, tha Syd Atkinson ag innse mun àr-a-mach. Chaidh an earrann seo a thogail bhon t-sreath 'Recollections' aig Moray Firth Radio a chaidh a chraoladh ann an 1991.

'On the Wednesday evening, Captain Bellairs, he was the skipper of the 'Rodney', he got his crew together and he told them that the Admiralty had promised that they would consider cases of hardship, and he promised that he would do his best for his men. The men realised they wouldn't have any chance of stating their case while they were at sea, or much support if they were up in Invergordon. They'd be better off in their home ports where they could let the public know about their grievances. So they gave Captain Bellairs a cheer and they said 'Right, we'll do what you say.' There was just one man refused to return to duty and he was placed under arrest. Similar sort of things took place on the 'Dorchester' and the 'Exeter' and the 'Norfolk' and the 'Adventure'. And so the Invergordon Mutiny was over.

At eleven o'clock on Wednesday evening, the 16th September, the ships weighed anchor and they left Invergordon to go back to their home ports. The Admiralty, of course, held an enquiry and there was a court martial. Twenty-four men actually were subsequently discharged from the navy. The leader of the mutiny was a man called Len Wincott. He was of course discharged and immediately left Britain and went to live in Moscow. And within a month, the Admiralty had revised the pay cuts and instead of losing twenty-five percent the new scales for ratings showed a cut of only about ten percent. The local news for Easter Ross in the issue of the 'Highland News' for the 26th September, 1931 reads, 'Large lorry loads of beer which were to be used during the fleet's stay at Invergordon have been returned by rail from the naval canteen and local hotels. It is hoped locally that the fleet, and also the beer, will make an early return'

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Àr-a-mach Inbhir Ghòrdain (2 de 2)

ROS: Ros Cuithne

1990an

àr-a-mach; stailcean; claistinneach

Rèidio Linne Mhoireibh

MFR: Invergordon Mutiny

B' ann anns an t-Sultain 1931 a bha Àr-a-mach Inbhir Ghòrdain. B' e àr-a-mach dreuchdail a bh' ann a ghabh seòladairean a' Chabhlaich Rìoghail an aghaidh gearraidhean tuarsatail a bha an riaghaltas a' dèanamh; b' i seo aon dhen na beagan stailcean nam feachdan ann an eachdraidh Bhreatainn. Anns an earrann labhairt seo, tha Syd Atkinson ag innse mun àr-a-mach. Chaidh an earrann seo a thogail bhon t-sreath 'Recollections' aig Moray Firth Radio a chaidh a chraoladh ann an 1991.<br /> <br /> 'On the Wednesday evening, Captain Bellairs, he was the skipper of the 'Rodney', he got his crew together and he told them that the Admiralty had promised that they would consider cases of hardship, and he promised that he would do his best for his men. The men realised they wouldn't have any chance of stating their case while they were at sea, or much support if they were up in Invergordon. They'd be better off in their home ports where they could let the public know about their grievances. So they gave Captain Bellairs a cheer and they said 'Right, we'll do what you say.' There was just one man refused to return to duty and he was placed under arrest. Similar sort of things took place on the 'Dorchester' and the 'Exeter' and the 'Norfolk' and the 'Adventure'. And so the Invergordon Mutiny was over. <br /> <br /> At eleven o'clock on Wednesday evening, the 16th September, the ships weighed anchor and they left Invergordon to go back to their home ports. The Admiralty, of course, held an enquiry and there was a court martial. Twenty-four men actually were subsequently discharged from the navy. The leader of the mutiny was a man called Len Wincott. He was of course discharged and immediately left Britain and went to live in Moscow. And within a month, the Admiralty had revised the pay cuts and instead of losing twenty-five percent the new scales for ratings showed a cut of only about ten percent. The local news for Easter Ross in the issue of the 'Highland News' for the 26th September, 1931 reads, 'Large lorry loads of beer which were to be used during the fleet's stay at Invergordon have been returned by rail from the naval canteen and local hotels. It is hoped locally that the fleet, and also the beer, will make an early return'