Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 15/08/2017
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TIOTAL
Eòin an sgrìobhaidhean Mhàrtainn MhicGilleMhàrtainn (1 a 2)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_ANDREWCURRIE_03
LINN
1980an; 1990an
CRUTHADAIR
Andrew Currie
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Taigh-tasgaidh is Gaileiridh Ealan Inbhir Nis
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
1808
KEYWORDS
luibh-eòlas
ainmh-eòlas
cunntasan-turais
clàraidhean-àitean
euneolas
Na h-Eileanan Siar
claistinneach

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Tha 'A Description of the Western Islands of Scotland' (1703) agus 'A Voyage to St Kilda' (1698) aig Màrtainn MacGilleMhàrtainn, am measg cuid dhe na ciad leabhraichean a thug aithris air beatha, cultar agus creideamh muinntir Innse Gall. San earrainn èisteachd seo, cluinnear fear-eòlais nàdair air an Eilean Sgitheanach - Anndra Currie - agus e ag aithneachadh mòran dhe na h-eòin a chaidh ainmeachadh an sgrìobhaidhean MhicGilleMhàrtainn.

When we come to birds Martin reported at least thirty-seven bird species from at least twenty-six islands. These numbers are less than precise because of difficulties either with identification or island geography. The wren was first noted on St. Kilda by Martin though it was many years later before it was identified as a sub-species. Ravens were seen on North Uist, Skye and Trodday. Of the latter he says, 'there is a couple of ravens in this isle which suffer none other of their kind to come thither; and when their own young are able to fly they beat them away also from the isle'. That story rings true to the naturalist.

Eagles are widely reported and it is clear that Martin recognised the two species. John Love, writing in 1983, in 'The Return of the Sea Eagle', gathered all of Martin's sea eagle records. He noted sea eagles in Harris, North Uist, St. Kilda, The Shiants, and Skye but the species finally became extinct in 1916. Unfortunately, hawks are lumped together and it is a great pity that the many references leave me guessing as to which hawks he saw. Some must have been the peregrine falcon, especially the St. Kilda ones. Many birds are given Old Scots names. A greater problem for me is the Gaelic names, often in phonetic spelling. Martin particularly recorded sea birds although all too often he resorted to the more general term, 'sea fowls'. Shag, gannet, fulmar, razorbill, guillemot and puffin are just a few. Gulls, he unfortunately lumps, again leaving me in doubt. The St. Kilda gannets are reported in a 'prodigious number' from the stacks, while from Soay there are 'infinite numbers' of fulmar, guillemot, razorbill and puffin. How I wish that he had attempted to count, as a modern bird man would do, even approximately to tens, hundreds, thousands.

The storm petrel is carefully described with dates of arrival, laying, hatching and departure. The most poignant account is of the gairfowl or great auk. Mary Bones in 1993 gives a full account of this bird, including the oft-repeated description. She says that St. Kilda is probably the most important site in Britain for the history of the gairfowl's status as a native bird and Martin Martin is one of the primary authorities on the appearance and habits of the bird. The last of these birds was seen alive and was killed in Iceland in 1884

When we come to birds Martin reported at least thirty-seven bird species from at least twenty-six islands. These numbers are less than precise because of difficulties either with identification or island geography. The wren was first noted on St. Kilda by Martin though it was many years later before it was identified as a sub-species. Ravens were seen on North Uist, Skye and Trodday. Of the latter he says, 'there is a couple of ravens in this isle which suffer none other of their kind to come thither; and when their own young are able to fly they beat them away also from the isle'. That story rings true to the naturalist.

Eagles are widely reported and it is clear that Martin recognised the two species. John Love, writing in 1983, in 'The Return of the Sea Eagle', gathered all of Martin's sea eagle records. He noted sea eagles in Harris, North Uist, St. Kilda, The Shiants, and Skye but the species finally became extinct in 1916. Unfortunately, hawks are lumped together and it is a great pity that the many references leave me guessing as to which hawks he saw. Some must have been the peregrine falcon, especially the St. Kilda ones. Many birds are given Old Scots names. A greater problem for me is the Gaelic names, often in phonetic spelling. Martin particularly recorded sea birds although all too often he resorted to the more general term, 'sea fowls'. Shag, gannet, fulmar, razorbill, guillemot and puffin are just a few. Gulls, he unfortunately lumps, again leaving me in doubt. The St. Kilda gannets are reported in a 'prodigious number' from the stacks, while from Soay there are 'infinite numbers' of fulmar, guillemot, razorbill and puffin. How I wish that he had attempted to count, as a modern bird man would do, even approximately to tens, hundreds, thousands.

The storm petrel is carefully described with dates of arrival, laying, hatching and departure. The most poignant account is of the gairfowl or great auk. Mary Bones in 1993 gives a full account of this bird, including the oft-repeated description. She says that St. Kilda is probably the most important site in Britain for the history of the gairfowl's status as a native bird and Martin Martin is one of the primary authorities on the appearance and habits of the bird. The last of these birds was seen alive and was killed in Iceland in 1884

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Eòin an sgrìobhaidhean Mhàrtainn MhicGilleMhàrtainn (1 a 2)

1980an; 1990an

luibh-eòlas; ainmh-eòlas; cunntasan-turais; clàraidhean-àitean; euneolas; Na h-Eileanan Siar; claistinneach

Taigh-tasgaidh is Gaileiridh Ealan Inbhir Nis

Bill Sinclair Audio: Martin Martin

Tha 'A Description of the Western Islands of Scotland' (1703) agus 'A Voyage to St Kilda' (1698) aig Màrtainn MacGilleMhàrtainn, am measg cuid dhe na ciad leabhraichean a thug aithris air beatha, cultar agus creideamh muinntir Innse Gall. San earrainn èisteachd seo, cluinnear fear-eòlais nàdair air an Eilean Sgitheanach - Anndra Currie - agus e ag aithneachadh mòran dhe na h-eòin a chaidh ainmeachadh an sgrìobhaidhean MhicGilleMhàrtainn.<br /> <br /> When we come to birds Martin reported at least thirty-seven bird species from at least twenty-six islands. These numbers are less than precise because of difficulties either with identification or island geography. The wren was first noted on St. Kilda by Martin though it was many years later before it was identified as a sub-species. Ravens were seen on North Uist, Skye and Trodday. Of the latter he says, 'there is a couple of ravens in this isle which suffer none other of their kind to come thither; and when their own young are able to fly they beat them away also from the isle'. That story rings true to the naturalist. <br /> <br /> Eagles are widely reported and it is clear that Martin recognised the two species. John Love, writing in 1983, in 'The Return of the Sea Eagle', gathered all of Martin's sea eagle records. He noted sea eagles in Harris, North Uist, St. Kilda, The Shiants, and Skye but the species finally became extinct in 1916. Unfortunately, hawks are lumped together and it is a great pity that the many references leave me guessing as to which hawks he saw. Some must have been the peregrine falcon, especially the St. Kilda ones. Many birds are given Old Scots names. A greater problem for me is the Gaelic names, often in phonetic spelling. Martin particularly recorded sea birds although all too often he resorted to the more general term, 'sea fowls'. Shag, gannet, fulmar, razorbill, guillemot and puffin are just a few. Gulls, he unfortunately lumps, again leaving me in doubt. The St. Kilda gannets are reported in a 'prodigious number' from the stacks, while from Soay there are 'infinite numbers' of fulmar, guillemot, razorbill and puffin. How I wish that he had attempted to count, as a modern bird man would do, even approximately to tens, hundreds, thousands. <br /> <br /> The storm petrel is carefully described with dates of arrival, laying, hatching and departure. The most poignant account is of the gairfowl or great auk. Mary Bones in 1993 gives a full account of this bird, including the oft-repeated description. She says that St. Kilda is probably the most important site in Britain for the history of the gairfowl's status as a native bird and Martin Martin is one of the primary authorities on the appearance and habits of the bird. The last of these birds was seen alive and was killed in Iceland in 1884<br /> <br /> When we come to birds Martin reported at least thirty-seven bird species from at least twenty-six islands. These numbers are less than precise because of difficulties either with identification or island geography. The wren was first noted on St. Kilda by Martin though it was many years later before it was identified as a sub-species. Ravens were seen on North Uist, Skye and Trodday. Of the latter he says, 'there is a couple of ravens in this isle which suffer none other of their kind to come thither; and when their own young are able to fly they beat them away also from the isle'. That story rings true to the naturalist. <br /> <br /> Eagles are widely reported and it is clear that Martin recognised the two species. John Love, writing in 1983, in 'The Return of the Sea Eagle', gathered all of Martin's sea eagle records. He noted sea eagles in Harris, North Uist, St. Kilda, The Shiants, and Skye but the species finally became extinct in 1916. Unfortunately, hawks are lumped together and it is a great pity that the many references leave me guessing as to which hawks he saw. Some must have been the peregrine falcon, especially the St. Kilda ones. Many birds are given Old Scots names. A greater problem for me is the Gaelic names, often in phonetic spelling. Martin particularly recorded sea birds although all too often he resorted to the more general term, 'sea fowls'. Shag, gannet, fulmar, razorbill, guillemot and puffin are just a few. Gulls, he unfortunately lumps, again leaving me in doubt. The St. Kilda gannets are reported in a 'prodigious number' from the stacks, while from Soay there are 'infinite numbers' of fulmar, guillemot, razorbill and puffin. How I wish that he had attempted to count, as a modern bird man would do, even approximately to tens, hundreds, thousands. <br /> <br /> The storm petrel is carefully described with dates of arrival, laying, hatching and departure. The most poignant account is of the gairfowl or great auk. Mary Bones in 1993 gives a full account of this bird, including the oft-repeated description. She says that St. Kilda is probably the most important site in Britain for the history of the gairfowl's status as a native bird and Martin Martin is one of the primary authorities on the appearance and habits of the bird. The last of these birds was seen alive and was killed in Iceland in 1884