Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 19/01/2017
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TIOTAL
Lusan agus Fiadh-Bheatha, Na Lochan Dubha, An t-Eilean Sgitheanach
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_ANDREWCURRIE_11
SGÌRE
An t-Eilean Sgitheanach
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
INBHIR NIS
LINN
1980an; 1990an
CRUTHADAIR
Andrew Currie
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Taigh-tasgaidh is Gaileiridh Ealan Inbhir Nis
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
1820
KEYWORDS
cruthan-tìre
cruth-tìre
euneolas
luibh-eòlas
flùranachd
claistinneach

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San earrainn èisteachd seo, cluinnear fear-eòlais nàdair air an Eilean Sgitheanach - Anndra Currie - agus e a' bruidhinn ri Uilleam Mac na Ceàrdaich mu na lusan agus am fiadh-bheatha rim faicinn ann agus mu thimcheall air sgìre nan Lochan Dubha, eadar An t-Àth Leathann agus Armadal.

One of the things that's special that grows in the loch is a few plants of the very rare pipewort, which is a plant, really, it's an American plant, which is present in one or two locations in the northwest of Scotland, mainly on Skye, with tiny examples elsewhere, and you'll see it just growing in the fringes of the loch here, and it's quite a rarity. The main place to see it, of course, is over at Sligachan, which is quite a distance from here. This is one of the outlying areas where it appears and we don't know how it appeared here, but it is a North American species and one can speculate as to whether it was brought over by birds on the move, or by some other means. And then there's the little club moss, also, the fir club moss, that you would see growing around in amongst the heather; a tiny little thing like a small pine tree. This is why it's called the fir club moss.

Interviewer: Well, the lochs themselves, there seems quite a few of them really, all with their little islands. I mean, we noticed quite a few as we came to the shore of the one we're alongside at the moment?

Yes, this is one of the medium sized ones. There are a number - I've never counted them - but there's a number of quite small ones. We'll walk over in a moment or two to one of the really big ones which is locally said to be quite good for fishing trout in and we can see what that one looks like. This is the sort of area too where you might expect to see otters now and again. I've not seen an otter here recently but I have in the past heard reports of them being here. I've even had a report of an osprey being seen.

Interviewer: Is that right?

A few years ago, yes. Somebody out very early in the morning saw an osprey hunting on the moors round about here. So even these brown, bare, desolate looking moors have their own types of wildlife if you're knowledgeable enough and know what to look for

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Lusan agus Fiadh-Bheatha, Na Lochan Dubha, An t-Eilean Sgitheanach

INBHIR NIS

1980an; 1990an

cruthan-tìre; cruth-tìre; euneolas; luibh-eòlas; flùranachd; claistinneach

Taigh-tasgaidh is Gaileiridh Ealan Inbhir Nis

Bill Sinclair Audio: Andrew Currie, Skye Naturalist

San earrainn èisteachd seo, cluinnear fear-eòlais nàdair air an Eilean Sgitheanach - Anndra Currie - agus e a' bruidhinn ri Uilleam Mac na Ceàrdaich mu na lusan agus am fiadh-bheatha rim faicinn ann agus mu thimcheall air sgìre nan Lochan Dubha, eadar An t-Àth Leathann agus Armadal.<br /> <br /> One of the things that's special that grows in the loch is a few plants of the very rare pipewort, which is a plant, really, it's an American plant, which is present in one or two locations in the northwest of Scotland, mainly on Skye, with tiny examples elsewhere, and you'll see it just growing in the fringes of the loch here, and it's quite a rarity. The main place to see it, of course, is over at Sligachan, which is quite a distance from here. This is one of the outlying areas where it appears and we don't know how it appeared here, but it is a North American species and one can speculate as to whether it was brought over by birds on the move, or by some other means. And then there's the little club moss, also, the fir club moss, that you would see growing around in amongst the heather; a tiny little thing like a small pine tree. This is why it's called the fir club moss.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Well, the lochs themselves, there seems quite a few of them really, all with their little islands. I mean, we noticed quite a few as we came to the shore of the one we're alongside at the moment?<br /> <br /> Yes, this is one of the medium sized ones. There are a number - I've never counted them - but there's a number of quite small ones. We'll walk over in a moment or two to one of the really big ones which is locally said to be quite good for fishing trout in and we can see what that one looks like. This is the sort of area too where you might expect to see otters now and again. I've not seen an otter here recently but I have in the past heard reports of them being here. I've even had a report of an osprey being seen.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Is that right?<br /> <br /> A few years ago, yes. Somebody out very early in the morning saw an osprey hunting on the moors round about here. So even these brown, bare, desolate looking moors have their own types of wildlife if you're knowledgeable enough and know what to look for