Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 15/08/2017
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TIOTAL
Cuairt Nàdair sa Ghleann Mhòr (3 de 4)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_DEREKMCGINN_03
LINN
1980an
CRUTHADAIR
Derek McGinn
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Taigh-tasgaidh is Gaileiridh Ealan Inbhir Nis
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
1886
KEYWORDS
faire-eòin
eun-eòlas
claistinneach

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Anns a' chlàradh èisteachd seo bho na 1980an, tha Uilleam Mac na Ceàrdaich ann an còmhradh ri neach-clàraidh neo-dhreuchdail bheathaichean fiadhaich, Ruairí Mac Fhinn, fhad 's a tha iad a' gabhail cuairt nàdair sa Ghleann Mhòr as t-Earrach.

Now look at this tree over here, Bill, look. It's a Scotch Pine which has fallen down, and just look at the trunk it's full of holes, and the bark's peeling off it, and the tree's obviously rotting away, and all the way up the trunk are these holes - about quarter to half an inch across - and this is where the great spotted woodpeckers have been digging and looking for the grubs of the wood wasps and other things, which are - have been - eggs have been laid in the wood. And the birds can detect the movement inside and then they, with their sharp beaks, they have a quick peck and open up the tree and get into the - Let's take this bit of bark off here just to show. Look. See that? The hole is really quite deep. The wood is relatively soft, you see? So that it's not too difficult for the bird to get in and dig out, dig out the creatures.

Interviewer: Do you see any bugs at all?

No, no. No. No. There we are.

Interviewer: Oh there we are. That's something there, isn't it? Oh no.

No.

Interviewer: No.

No.

Interviewer: Just my imagination.

Yes but you can -

Interviewer: I was expecting a sort of large, long, beetly sort of thing to come out.

Well but you can see there though, nevertheless, although there's nothing there, you can see, what one might call, for the lack of a better word, sawdust -

Interviewer: Yes.

- and that's, of course, caused by the grubs that live in the wood, eating the timber, and then they take the nutrition out of it and what they leave behind is this sort of frass of sawdust-like material.

Interviewer: Just like the dry rot on the back of your good piece of antique furniture?

That's exactly what it is. That's right. Yea

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Cuairt Nàdair sa Ghleann Mhòr (3 de 4)

1980an

faire-eòin; eun-eòlas; claistinneach

Taigh-tasgaidh is Gaileiridh Ealan Inbhir Nis

Bill Sinclair Audio: Great Glen

Anns a' chlàradh èisteachd seo bho na 1980an, tha Uilleam Mac na Ceàrdaich ann an còmhradh ri neach-clàraidh neo-dhreuchdail bheathaichean fiadhaich, Ruairí Mac Fhinn, fhad 's a tha iad a' gabhail cuairt nàdair sa Ghleann Mhòr as t-Earrach.<br /> <br /> Now look at this tree over here, Bill, look. It's a Scotch Pine which has fallen down, and just look at the trunk it's full of holes, and the bark's peeling off it, and the tree's obviously rotting away, and all the way up the trunk are these holes - about quarter to half an inch across - and this is where the great spotted woodpeckers have been digging and looking for the grubs of the wood wasps and other things, which are - have been - eggs have been laid in the wood. And the birds can detect the movement inside and then they, with their sharp beaks, they have a quick peck and open up the tree and get into the - Let's take this bit of bark off here just to show. Look. See that? The hole is really quite deep. The wood is relatively soft, you see? So that it's not too difficult for the bird to get in and dig out, dig out the creatures.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Do you see any bugs at all?<br /> <br /> No, no. No. No. There we are.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Oh there we are. That's something there, isn't it? Oh no. <br /> <br /> No.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: No.<br /> <br /> No.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Just my imagination.<br /> <br /> Yes but you can -<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I was expecting a sort of large, long, beetly sort of thing to come out.<br /> <br /> Well but you can see there though, nevertheless, although there's nothing there, you can see, what one might call, for the lack of a better word, sawdust -<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> - and that's, of course, caused by the grubs that live in the wood, eating the timber, and then they take the nutrition out of it and what they leave behind is this sort of frass of sawdust-like material.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Just like the dry rot on the back of your good piece of antique furniture?<br /> <br /> That's exactly what it is. That's right. Yea