Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 08/11/2017
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TIOTAL
Faire-eòin ann an Acarsaid Inbhir Nis (1 de 3)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_DEREKMCGINN_05
ÀITE
Inbhir Nis
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
INBHIR NIS: Inbhir Nis 's Am Bànath
LINN
1980an
CRUTHADAIR
Derek McGinn
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Taigh-tasgaidh is Gaileiridh Ealan Inbhir Nis
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
1889
KEYWORDS
a' faire eòin
eun-eòlas
claistinneach

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Anns a' chlàradh èisteachd seo bho na 1980an, tha Uilleam Mac na Ceàrdaich ann an còmhradh ri Ruairí Mac Fhinn, neach-clàraidh neo-dhreuchdail fiadh-bheatha eile, fhad 's a tha iad a' cuimseachadh air faire-eòin aig Acarsaid Inbhir Nis.

Isn't it interesting to think we're standing on a piece of ground that wasn't here what, twelve, sixteen months, eighteen months ago - the new quay? And already there are buildings going up, part of the development here, and over behind us in the background, there's some much older buildings which are the original hangars used by - used at the time when the very first Highland air service was underway. So, in a space of what, fifty years, we've got these changes within a few hundred yards of each other.

Interviewer: Well, this is the new development for Inverness Harbour, and standing beside one of the storage sheds that are being built, looking out to over to the Black Isle and the Kessock Bridge in the background, everything seems different.

Oh well, it's a completely new perspective; a different view altogether, and with the hill in the background there and the tall trees, it's really quite attractive with the scattering of houses. And, of course, although this is a change, the wildlife always seems to adapt to these changes, and on this great big, newish area the gulls have decided it's a nice place to roost, and we've got oh, about several hundred gulls there, mainly herring gulls, but quite a few great black backs amongst them. And you can see some black headed gulls coming up the river now, and some, some more merganser and some tufted duck, I think, there as well so it's great that you can sort of, right on the edge of the town, even in the town, the houses across there they, like the earlier ones we were talking about, have a great view of these things, if they have eye to see.

Interviewer: Look, look at that Derek, just down near the point, you know, at the mouth of the river there, there's a guillemot flying. Now I don't think I've seen a guillemot ever flying so far upstream before.

You don't get - you don't all that many of them, but there's quite a - I have seen them, from time to time. Yes.

Interviewer: It's flying out just over to North Kessock there.

That's right, and most often you see them sitting or standing looking like little penguins but in flight they've got that rapid, dashing flight. Keep fairly low over the water

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Faire-eòin ann an Acarsaid Inbhir Nis (1 de 3)

INBHIR NIS: Inbhir Nis 's Am Bànath

1980an

a' faire eòin; eun-eòlas; claistinneach

Taigh-tasgaidh is Gaileiridh Ealan Inbhir Nis

Bill Sinclair Audio: Bird Watching

Anns a' chlàradh èisteachd seo bho na 1980an, tha Uilleam Mac na Ceàrdaich ann an còmhradh ri Ruairí Mac Fhinn, neach-clàraidh neo-dhreuchdail fiadh-bheatha eile, fhad 's a tha iad a' cuimseachadh air faire-eòin aig Acarsaid Inbhir Nis.<br /> <br /> Isn't it interesting to think we're standing on a piece of ground that wasn't here what, twelve, sixteen months, eighteen months ago - the new quay? And already there are buildings going up, part of the development here, and over behind us in the background, there's some much older buildings which are the original hangars used by - used at the time when the very first Highland air service was underway. So, in a space of what, fifty years, we've got these changes within a few hundred yards of each other.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Well, this is the new development for Inverness Harbour, and standing beside one of the storage sheds that are being built, looking out to over to the Black Isle and the Kessock Bridge in the background, everything seems different. <br /> <br /> Oh well, it's a completely new perspective; a different view altogether, and with the hill in the background there and the tall trees, it's really quite attractive with the scattering of houses. And, of course, although this is a change, the wildlife always seems to adapt to these changes, and on this great big, newish area the gulls have decided it's a nice place to roost, and we've got oh, about several hundred gulls there, mainly herring gulls, but quite a few great black backs amongst them. And you can see some black headed gulls coming up the river now, and some, some more merganser and some tufted duck, I think, there as well so it's great that you can sort of, right on the edge of the town, even in the town, the houses across there they, like the earlier ones we were talking about, have a great view of these things, if they have eye to see. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Look, look at that Derek, just down near the point, you know, at the mouth of the river there, there's a guillemot flying. Now I don't think I've seen a guillemot ever flying so far upstream before. <br /> <br /> You don't get - you don't all that many of them, but there's quite a - I have seen them, from time to time. Yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: It's flying out just over to North Kessock there.<br /> <br /> That's right, and most often you see them sitting or standing looking like little penguins but in flight they've got that rapid, dashing flight. Keep fairly low over the water