Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 15/08/2017
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TIOTAL
deargan-giuthais air A' Ghàidhealtachd
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_DESTHOMSON_04
LINN
1980an; 1990an
CRUTHADAIR
Desmond Nethersole-Thompson
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Taigh-tasgaidh is Gaileiridh Ealan Inbhir Nis
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
1899
KEYWORDS
eun-eòlas
coimhead air eòin
claistinneach

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Thàinig Desmond Nethersole-Thompson chun na Gàidhealtachd an toiseach ann an 1932 gus eòin a rannsachadh. An dèidh cha mhòr fichead bliadhna de rannsachadh ann an Gleann Spè, dh'fhoillsich e a' chiad aithris aige air gnè nan deochan-biugh. Bho 1964, bha e fhèin agus a theaghlach a' fuireach ann an gleann iomallach ann an Cataibh as t-earrach far an robh iad a' leantainn deochan-biugh fad iomadh bliadhna an dèidh a chèile. Anns an earrann èisteachd seo bho 1980, tha Desmond a' toirt iomradh air an deargan-giuthais.

Now, I first came to the Highlands in 1932 when I was encouraged to specialise by a number of very fine and very great ornithologists. I started to live here in 1934, and here I've had my life and my laboratories there, and I still watch and study and each year try to learn a little more. In the thirties, I remember so well, almost before winter was over, and away into the old pine woods of Strathspey, to study the crossbills. My word, the crossbills are among the most marvellous of our small, small birds with a specially evolved bill which is adapted, crossed, to take out seeds from pines. And I was able to watch the flocks of these lovely birds, the cock, the scarlet plumage and the hen green, in their flocks and then mating parties breaking away from them and eventually I was able to watch the nest being built and then had the great excitement and joy of watching the cock fly in from perhaps half a mile or mile away, land on a treetop, and then feed the hen on the nest. And all the time you knew the nest was there right up in the tops of pines. She had a little chittering cry, little squeaky cries, until he came and fed her. And these hens, oh they sat so tightly at times, and I've been up in my work, had to look in to find out how many eggs to compare the clutch size, I've actually lifted the hen crossbill off the nest, thrown her up and she's come down and settled on my finger, fingers, and I put her back on the eggs. Really extraordinary, fascinating, little birds and over the years we were able to do enough work to write a whole book - a monograph - about them and we discovered that our Scottish crossbills were actually a different species from those which come periodically into Britain from the Soviet Union and Fennoscandia; beautiful birds and a marvellous study they were

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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deargan-giuthais air A' Ghàidhealtachd

1980an; 1990an

eun-eòlas; coimhead air eòin; claistinneach

Taigh-tasgaidh is Gaileiridh Ealan Inbhir Nis

Bill Sinclair Audio: Bird Watching

Thàinig Desmond Nethersole-Thompson chun na Gàidhealtachd an toiseach ann an 1932 gus eòin a rannsachadh. An dèidh cha mhòr fichead bliadhna de rannsachadh ann an Gleann Spè, dh'fhoillsich e a' chiad aithris aige air gnè nan deochan-biugh. Bho 1964, bha e fhèin agus a theaghlach a' fuireach ann an gleann iomallach ann an Cataibh as t-earrach far an robh iad a' leantainn deochan-biugh fad iomadh bliadhna an dèidh a chèile. Anns an earrann èisteachd seo bho 1980, tha Desmond a' toirt iomradh air an deargan-giuthais.<br /> <br /> Now, I first came to the Highlands in 1932 when I was encouraged to specialise by a number of very fine and very great ornithologists. I started to live here in 1934, and here I've had my life and my laboratories there, and I still watch and study and each year try to learn a little more. In the thirties, I remember so well, almost before winter was over, and away into the old pine woods of Strathspey, to study the crossbills. My word, the crossbills are among the most marvellous of our small, small birds with a specially evolved bill which is adapted, crossed, to take out seeds from pines. And I was able to watch the flocks of these lovely birds, the cock, the scarlet plumage and the hen green, in their flocks and then mating parties breaking away from them and eventually I was able to watch the nest being built and then had the great excitement and joy of watching the cock fly in from perhaps half a mile or mile away, land on a treetop, and then feed the hen on the nest. And all the time you knew the nest was there right up in the tops of pines. She had a little chittering cry, little squeaky cries, until he came and fed her. And these hens, oh they sat so tightly at times, and I've been up in my work, had to look in to find out how many eggs to compare the clutch size, I've actually lifted the hen crossbill off the nest, thrown her up and she's come down and settled on my finger, fingers, and I put her back on the eggs. Really extraordinary, fascinating, little birds and over the years we were able to do enough work to write a whole book - a monograph - about them and we discovered that our Scottish crossbills were actually a different species from those which come periodically into Britain from the Soviet Union and Fennoscandia; beautiful birds and a marvellous study they were