Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 15/08/2017
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TIOTAL
Taigh Mhic a' Mhuilleir (1 de 3)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_MARYFYFE_01
ÀITE
Cromba
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS: Crombaidh
LINN
1980an; 1990an
CRUTHADAIR
Mary Fyfe
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Taigh-tasgaidh is Gaileiridh Ealan Inbhir Nis
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
2106
KEYWORDS
taighean
tughadh
geòlaiche
geòlaichean
claistinneach

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Rugadh Ùisdean Mac a'Mhuilleir ann an Crombaidh anns a'bhliadhna ochd ceud deug agus a dhà. Ged a b' e clachaireachd a'cheàird a bh'aige, chaidh e air adhart gu bhith na sgrìobhadair agus na neach-naidheachd torrach a bha a'cur còmhla a chreideamhan cràbhach agus ùidh ann an geòlas agus beul-aithris. Tha an taigh a bh'aige, a chaidh a thogail timcheall air seachd ceud deug agus a h-aon deug, a-nis na thaigh-tasgaidh fo shealbh Urras Nàiseanta na h-Alba. Anns an earrann èisteachd seo, tha Uilleam Mac na Ceàrdaich a'faighinn barrachd a-mach mu thaigh Mhic a'Mhuilleir bho Mhàiri Fyfe.

Interviewer: This must be the last thatched cottage in the Black Isle now?

Yes, I think it is. Actually, the cottage was last re-thatched in 1977 and we're hoping it will last for another forty years.

Interviewer: Do you have difficulty in getting thatchers nowadays?

Yes, we have to go England, we had to go to Warwickshire actually, to get the thatcher and the reeds come from the Tay Estuary. When I say reeds, this is more an English type thatching, but originally all the cottages in Cromarty were thatched with straw and clay. Well now, would you like to come inside?

Interviewer: Oh I would.

The doors and low and the ceilings are low but you come into quite a different atmosphere -

Interviewer: You certainly do

- as soon as you come through the door.

Interviewer: Now, we're in the - perhaps is it the - would it have been the living room in the - in Hugh Miller's days?

Yes, I think it might have been called a workroom because we have here, for example, a very strange looking fireplace where they would burn pine cones and wood chips on the floor and the smoke would be taken up through this very odd shaped chimney to smoke the fish.

Interviewer: You've left a bit of the, the wall here exposed, is this just to show the - how it was constructed?

Yes, the whole building, of course, is the same as this bit here. We've got large stones, small stones, red clay soil, and straw to bind it all together. You would hardly think that it would stand so well from 1711 but hopefully it'll stay another two or three hundred years.

Interviewer: How high do you - is the door there?

About four feet I think, but Hugh Miller himself was five feet eight, but when he lived in it, it was an earth floor. We've put Caithness slabs on top; it's probably raised it about four or five inches

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Taigh Mhic a' Mhuilleir (1 de 3)

ROS: Crombaidh

1980an; 1990an

taighean; tughadh; geòlaiche; geòlaichean; claistinneach

Taigh-tasgaidh is Gaileiridh Ealan Inbhir Nis

Bill Sinclair Audio: Hugh Miller

Rugadh Ùisdean Mac a'Mhuilleir ann an Crombaidh anns a'bhliadhna ochd ceud deug agus a dhà. Ged a b' e clachaireachd a'cheàird a bh'aige, chaidh e air adhart gu bhith na sgrìobhadair agus na neach-naidheachd torrach a bha a'cur còmhla a chreideamhan cràbhach agus ùidh ann an geòlas agus beul-aithris. Tha an taigh a bh'aige, a chaidh a thogail timcheall air seachd ceud deug agus a h-aon deug, a-nis na thaigh-tasgaidh fo shealbh Urras Nàiseanta na h-Alba. Anns an earrann èisteachd seo, tha Uilleam Mac na Ceàrdaich a'faighinn barrachd a-mach mu thaigh Mhic a'Mhuilleir bho Mhàiri Fyfe.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: This must be the last thatched cottage in the Black Isle now?<br /> <br /> Yes, I think it is. Actually, the cottage was last re-thatched in 1977 and we're hoping it will last for another forty years.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Do you have difficulty in getting thatchers nowadays?<br /> <br /> Yes, we have to go England, we had to go to Warwickshire actually, to get the thatcher and the reeds come from the Tay Estuary. When I say reeds, this is more an English type thatching, but originally all the cottages in Cromarty were thatched with straw and clay. Well now, would you like to come inside?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Oh I would.<br /> <br /> The doors and low and the ceilings are low but you come into quite a different atmosphere -<br /> <br /> Interviewer: You certainly do<br /> <br /> - as soon as you come through the door.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now, we're in the - perhaps is it the - would it have been the living room in the - in Hugh Miller's days?<br /> <br /> Yes, I think it might have been called a workroom because we have here, for example, a very strange looking fireplace where they would burn pine cones and wood chips on the floor and the smoke would be taken up through this very odd shaped chimney to smoke the fish.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: You've left a bit of the, the wall here exposed, is this just to show the - how it was constructed?<br /> <br /> Yes, the whole building, of course, is the same as this bit here. We've got large stones, small stones, red clay soil, and straw to bind it all together. You would hardly think that it would stand so well from 1711 but hopefully it'll stay another two or three hundred years. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: How high do you - is the door there?<br /> <br /> About four feet I think, but Hugh Miller himself was five feet eight, but when he lived in it, it was an earth floor. We've put Caithness slabs on top; it's probably raised it about four or five inches