Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 05/01/2017
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TIOTAL
Cuimhneachain air seann Inbhir Nis
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_TOTTIEBROWN_04
ÀITE
Inbhir Nis
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
INBHIR NIS: Inbhir Nis 's Am Bànath
LINN
1980an
CRUTHADAIR
unknown
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Taigh-tasgaidh is Gaileiridh Ealan Inbhir Nis
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
2276
KEYWORDS
carbadan
carbadan each
còmhdhail
claistinneach

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Anns an earrainn labhairt seo, tha tè a bha a' fuireach ann an Inbhir Nis a' cuimhneachadh air a h-òige an uair a bha i a' fàs suas air Sràid a' Chaisteil anns a' chiad chairteal dhen fhicheadamh linn. Chaidh an clàradh a dhèanamh mu 1986.

'Aye Inverness has changed completely though - just a little country town when I was little, horse and cart. All horses. And next door to us was - You know Bobbo Mackay that was the provost for a while, you know, well, he was next door to us, you know? And his father was the - he used to break horses, and he used to do the four-in-hands, and he would say to us in the summer time (they had a big family though) and he would say, 'I'll take Nannie and Tottie. Dress them up,' tell my mother, 'dress them up' - my mother wasn't very keen - and I'll stop the horses on the brae' - that's going up Culduthel Brae. And he would take us to Culloden; if there was room at the back for us, and we hadn't to speak to any of the toffs. And he'd the bugle at the back, and all in livery and everything, and Mr. Mackay in the front with his - What do you call the man in front again? Oh, I should know all that, my memory's not so good now, and he'd be in the front wi the four horses. He was a great man wi the horses.

Was he the coachman?

Aye, they'd another name for it.

Aye, they'd another name for it.

Another name for it, aye. And then he would break up and then the ladies would all come out and the gentlemen to the cairngorm - to the cairn in Culloden and we had to sit at the side of the road, not open our mouth. And then he'd go back round Balloch - course it was only villages then, of course, if he was - and back by Eastgate and then he'd stop at Eastgate and we'd to take off again there. That was only if there was room for us. Once or twice. It was the highlight in our lives to get that. He was an awful nice gentleman, Bobbo's father. He loved his horses and he was broken hearted when they told him he'd to drive a car. He was an old man by this time and he said, 'I'll never drive a car', but he did.

Who was he employed with, Tottie?

Macrae and Dicks. Oh yes, Macrae and Dicks was the chief there - and his grandfather before him, his father and grandfather, they were all breaking, break the horses, they were all horsemen.

Mm-hmm'

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Cuimhneachain air seann Inbhir Nis

INBHIR NIS: Inbhir Nis 's Am Bànath

1980an

carbadan; carbadan each; còmhdhail; claistinneach

Taigh-tasgaidh is Gaileiridh Ealan Inbhir Nis

Bill Sinclair Audio: Inverness Recollections

Anns an earrainn labhairt seo, tha tè a bha a' fuireach ann an Inbhir Nis a' cuimhneachadh air a h-òige an uair a bha i a' fàs suas air Sràid a' Chaisteil anns a' chiad chairteal dhen fhicheadamh linn. Chaidh an clàradh a dhèanamh mu 1986.<br /> <br /> 'Aye Inverness has changed completely though - just a little country town when I was little, horse and cart. All horses. And next door to us was - You know Bobbo Mackay that was the provost for a while, you know, well, he was next door to us, you know? And his father was the - he used to break horses, and he used to do the four-in-hands, and he would say to us in the summer time (they had a big family though) and he would say, 'I'll take Nannie and Tottie. Dress them up,' tell my mother, 'dress them up' - my mother wasn't very keen - and I'll stop the horses on the brae' - that's going up Culduthel Brae. And he would take us to Culloden; if there was room at the back for us, and we hadn't to speak to any of the toffs. And he'd the bugle at the back, and all in livery and everything, and Mr. Mackay in the front with his - What do you call the man in front again? Oh, I should know all that, my memory's not so good now, and he'd be in the front wi the four horses. He was a great man wi the horses.<br /> <br /> Was he the coachman?<br /> <br /> Aye, they'd another name for it.<br /> <br /> Aye, they'd another name for it. <br /> <br /> Another name for it, aye. And then he would break up and then the ladies would all come out and the gentlemen to the cairngorm - to the cairn in Culloden and we had to sit at the side of the road, not open our mouth. And then he'd go back round Balloch - course it was only villages then, of course, if he was - and back by Eastgate and then he'd stop at Eastgate and we'd to take off again there. That was only if there was room for us. Once or twice. It was the highlight in our lives to get that. He was an awful nice gentleman, Bobbo's father. He loved his horses and he was broken hearted when they told him he'd to drive a car. He was an old man by this time and he said, 'I'll never drive a car', but he did. <br /> <br /> Who was he employed with, Tottie?<br /> <br /> Macrae and Dicks. Oh yes, Macrae and Dicks was the chief there - and his grandfather before him, his father and grandfather, they were all breaking, break the horses, they were all horsemen.<br /> <br /> Mm-hmm'