Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 15/08/2017
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TIOTAL
Gaelic Arts Agency Storytelling Project - clip 13
EXTERNAL ID
PC_LEWIS_STORY_TELLERS_2_5
DEIT
1999
LINN
1990an
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Essie Stewart
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
2697
KEYWORDS

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Calum Ferguson is the speaker in this clip, and he has been assisting Chrisella in this week's 'story tour' in the Long Island. He starts off by mentioning the village of Bragar and of family ties there to Martins in his own village, which was built in 1824, just a few years after the Napoleonic wars. Three villages were built at that time: Portnangiuran, Portavoller and Bailechuil in Back. He tells how his own family, the Fergusons, came from the Black Isle over to Lewis at that time. He says that the Murrays, who were at that time Blacksmiths in Ness to the MacLeod family, were removed and the Fergusons brought in in their place. Nearly all my ancestors were of the 'Gobhaichean', the blacksmiths. So this Donald Martin came over from the west side (from Borve, prompts a member of the audience) and he took over Lot No 9, which is our family croft today. He had a son and grandson both called Donald, so the grandson was Donald of Donald of Donald Martin, and he was called Donald of the three Donalds. He had no sons, but his daughter Marianne is at present in Dun Eistean (old folks' home) where many folk visit her.

Now Donald was famous for two things in Point, and one of them was for (building?) the fishing boat, the Britannia, which was owned by the Pabail piper, just before the First World War. Many of the Leith boats were Fifers and were very fast sailing against the wind, but the Britannia was a Zulu type vessel. This night the Leith boats learned that there was a big shoal of herring off-shore at Tolsta. The Britannia and a few other Stornoway boats sailed to join them and to set their nets, and that was in the afternoon. In the night they hauled in the nets, full of herring. They wanted to get to the Stornoway fish market before the Leith boats, so as soon as the last net was in, they headed off to the town. But this was a boat without engines, it had to tack against the wind. (Don't look at me like that - this is a true story!) The wind was from the South, so instead of heading straight in towards land, they had to tack out towards the sea. So as soon as the Skipper felt they had tacked out far enough, he turned her back towards the island, shouting that they were putting about, and as they did, the sail swung across the boat. It hit Donald and he was catapulted out of the boat into the sea in the darkness. These boats, it seems, had big loose rollers at the bow of the boat to assist with the hauling in of the nets. One of the other fishermen saw Donald going over and he grabbed one of these rollers and threw it overboard after Donald. Then they all took up their lanterns and started to shine them over the sea and shout to Donald, but there was no sign, just the dark waves. After some time searching they concluded they had lost Donald, so put the sail back up to head in to harbour. They also raised a basket on the bow mast, a sign that a crew member had been lost.

Now, as it happened, one of the Leith boats was only half an hour behind them, and had taken the same tack out to sea before heading for port. As they changed tack to come about, they heard a bang on the hull, and looked over, and there was a round post in the sea and a man, unconscious, hanging on to it. They managed to haul the wooden post and the man on board. They brought him round and took him down to the captain's cabin and put dry clothes on him, the skipper's Sunday suit, and his peaked cap, and gave him a pipe of tobacco - the best smoke he ever had, said Donald later. However there was a language problem because the Leith fishers spoke no Gaelic and Donald's English was poor and he couldn't understand them. Anyway, the Leith boat then headed for port, and in the darkness overtook many of the Zulus, including the Britannia, and came in as one of the first to tie up. Donald, realising that news of his death would come ashore with the Britannia and get to his mother who had a bad heart, leapt off the Leith boat, dressed as he was and ran along the quay looking for the Britannia. He then spotted her still a bit out, making for the quay, and he was there to catch the rope they threw ashore. When the boys looked up to the quay above their heads, they saw 'Donald' all dressed in a good suit and a skipper's cap, and they rushed off to the stern of the boat and wouldn't go near him, assuming it was his ghost! Now that's a true story.

If you look up the prophesies of the Brahan Seer, Coinneach Odhar (who was from Lewis), you'll see another story about Donald Martin, where the Seer prophesied that a brindled cow belonging to Donald of the Three Donalds would bear a two-headed calf, and that destruction would follow in the world. Now this birth did happen in 1939, but fate had taken a turn, because the cow belonged to Donald's neighbour, a different Donald, so something went wrong in the Seer's prophecies!

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Gaelic Arts Agency Storytelling Project - clip 13

1990an

Essie Stewart

Lewis Storytellers (short films)

Calum Ferguson is the speaker in this clip, and he has been assisting Chrisella in this week's 'story tour' in the Long Island. He starts off by mentioning the village of Bragar and of family ties there to Martins in his own village, which was built in 1824, just a few years after the Napoleonic wars. Three villages were built at that time: Portnangiuran, Portavoller and Bailechuil in Back. He tells how his own family, the Fergusons, came from the Black Isle over to Lewis at that time. He says that the Murrays, who were at that time Blacksmiths in Ness to the MacLeod family, were removed and the Fergusons brought in in their place. Nearly all my ancestors were of the 'Gobhaichean', the blacksmiths. So this Donald Martin came over from the west side (from Borve, prompts a member of the audience) and he took over Lot No 9, which is our family croft today. He had a son and grandson both called Donald, so the grandson was Donald of Donald of Donald Martin, and he was called Donald of the three Donalds. He had no sons, but his daughter Marianne is at present in Dun Eistean (old folks' home) where many folk visit her. <br /> <br /> Now Donald was famous for two things in Point, and one of them was for (building?) the fishing boat, the Britannia, which was owned by the Pabail piper, just before the First World War. Many of the Leith boats were Fifers and were very fast sailing against the wind, but the Britannia was a Zulu type vessel. This night the Leith boats learned that there was a big shoal of herring off-shore at Tolsta. The Britannia and a few other Stornoway boats sailed to join them and to set their nets, and that was in the afternoon. In the night they hauled in the nets, full of herring. They wanted to get to the Stornoway fish market before the Leith boats, so as soon as the last net was in, they headed off to the town. But this was a boat without engines, it had to tack against the wind. (Don't look at me like that - this is a true story!) The wind was from the South, so instead of heading straight in towards land, they had to tack out towards the sea. So as soon as the Skipper felt they had tacked out far enough, he turned her back towards the island, shouting that they were putting about, and as they did, the sail swung across the boat. It hit Donald and he was catapulted out of the boat into the sea in the darkness. These boats, it seems, had big loose rollers at the bow of the boat to assist with the hauling in of the nets. One of the other fishermen saw Donald going over and he grabbed one of these rollers and threw it overboard after Donald. Then they all took up their lanterns and started to shine them over the sea and shout to Donald, but there was no sign, just the dark waves. After some time searching they concluded they had lost Donald, so put the sail back up to head in to harbour. They also raised a basket on the bow mast, a sign that a crew member had been lost.<br /> <br /> Now, as it happened, one of the Leith boats was only half an hour behind them, and had taken the same tack out to sea before heading for port. As they changed tack to come about, they heard a bang on the hull, and looked over, and there was a round post in the sea and a man, unconscious, hanging on to it. They managed to haul the wooden post and the man on board. They brought him round and took him down to the captain's cabin and put dry clothes on him, the skipper's Sunday suit, and his peaked cap, and gave him a pipe of tobacco - the best smoke he ever had, said Donald later. However there was a language problem because the Leith fishers spoke no Gaelic and Donald's English was poor and he couldn't understand them. Anyway, the Leith boat then headed for port, and in the darkness overtook many of the Zulus, including the Britannia, and came in as one of the first to tie up. Donald, realising that news of his death would come ashore with the Britannia and get to his mother who had a bad heart, leapt off the Leith boat, dressed as he was and ran along the quay looking for the Britannia. He then spotted her still a bit out, making for the quay, and he was there to catch the rope they threw ashore. When the boys looked up to the quay above their heads, they saw 'Donald' all dressed in a good suit and a skipper's cap, and they rushed off to the stern of the boat and wouldn't go near him, assuming it was his ghost! Now that's a true story.<br /> <br /> If you look up the prophesies of the Brahan Seer, Coinneach Odhar (who was from Lewis), you'll see another story about Donald Martin, where the Seer prophesied that a brindled cow belonging to Donald of the Three Donalds would bear a two-headed calf, and that destruction would follow in the world. Now this birth did happen in 1939, but fate had taken a turn, because the cow belonged to Donald's neighbour, a different Donald, so something went wrong in the Seer's prophecies!