Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 19/04/2018
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TIOTAL
Drochaid Welsh (3)
EXTERNAL ID
PC_HRS_STATIONS_001_788
ÀITE
Inbhir Nis
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
INBHIR NIS: Inbhir Nis 's Am Bànath
CRUTHADAIR
Whyte
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Comunn Rèile na Gàidhealtachd
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
27496
KEYWORDS
HRS
Welsh's Bridge (3)

Nochd an dealbh camara seo san 'Highland Railway Journal' Àir. 49 leis an tuairisgeul a leanas le Daibhidh Stirling:

"The photograph is of the approaches to Inverness from the east in 1897, before the building of the direct line from Aviemore. The photographer is facing west, looking towards the station and Welsh's Bridge, which is the bridge in the background. The line here was opened in 1855 by the Inverness and Nairn Railway, taken over by the Inverness & Aberdeen Junction Railway once the line had been extended to meet the Great North of Scotland at Keith. Following the opening of the line from Forres to Perth in 1863, the I&AJR decided to double the line between Inverness and Forres and the first stage of this, between Inverness and Dalcross was doubled in 1864. Thereafter the railway found that it could be left as single track. The line was singled once more in 1967.

On the left is the ticket platform for Inverness, dating from 1863, for trains coming from the south. Trains stopped here for tickets to be collected, thereby avoiding any such complications on arrival at the terminus (and leaving little opportunity for fare evasion). There was another to the north of the station. This platform was swept away in the year following the photograph, when the yards at Inverness were greatly expanded and a loop line and sidings were built through the site. The signals are the outer home and advanced starting signals for Welsh's Bridge cabin, which is out of sight through the bridge from which it got its name. The starting signal on the right has only the one lens in the spectacles, as it showed a white light in the "all clear" position, something which lasted on the HR until 1903. The home signal, however, has two glasses, as its indication when "off' was a green light for caution; this was a common practice, with the advantage that on the approach to a station the station lights in the background could not be confused for an indication of a home signal.

Notice the occupation crossing where the two men are standing, with the corresponding break in the ticket platform. This was less inconvenient that it appears at first sight, for the public were not allowed to use the platform, which was just for the ticket collectors' convenience. (They would walk out from Inverness when a train was due.)

At the far end of the platform is a junction signal, and beyond it a facing crossover. The right hand signal governed movements onto the 'wrong" line, which in turn gave access to some of the platforms at Inverness station, and also to the single line connection to the Far North and to a branch to Inverness Harbour. This was fundamentally remodelled in 1898 when the direct line to Aviemore opened throughout. The house on the left was also swept away in the changes shortly after this photo was taken. Its interest, however, lies in its having been the home of David Jones, the HR's Locomotive Superintendent. Like a lot of the senior officers of the company, Jones occupied the post for many years, relinquishing it in 1896 after sustaining an accident while out on the line.

The photographer is standing about the place where Millburn Junction later came to be, with Raigmore level crossing fifty yards or so behind. The left hand line has now been lifted to make room for the road which encroaches from the left, and on the right there is now the low embankment of the direct line to Aviemore. There is now no feature at all of the railway which has remained unaltered except the line of the right hand track, which is still where it always was"

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Drochaid Welsh (3)

INBHIR NIS: Inbhir Nis 's Am Bànath

HRS

Comunn Rèile na Gàidhealtachd

Highland Railway Society - Stations

Nochd an dealbh camara seo san 'Highland Railway Journal' Àir. 49 leis an tuairisgeul a leanas le Daibhidh Stirling:<br /> <br /> "The photograph is of the approaches to Inverness from the east in 1897, before the building of the direct line from Aviemore. The photographer is facing west, looking towards the station and Welsh's Bridge, which is the bridge in the background. The line here was opened in 1855 by the Inverness and Nairn Railway, taken over by the Inverness & Aberdeen Junction Railway once the line had been extended to meet the Great North of Scotland at Keith. Following the opening of the line from Forres to Perth in 1863, the I&AJR decided to double the line between Inverness and Forres and the first stage of this, between Inverness and Dalcross was doubled in 1864. Thereafter the railway found that it could be left as single track. The line was singled once more in 1967.<br /> <br /> On the left is the ticket platform for Inverness, dating from 1863, for trains coming from the south. Trains stopped here for tickets to be collected, thereby avoiding any such complications on arrival at the terminus (and leaving little opportunity for fare evasion). There was another to the north of the station. This platform was swept away in the year following the photograph, when the yards at Inverness were greatly expanded and a loop line and sidings were built through the site. The signals are the outer home and advanced starting signals for Welsh's Bridge cabin, which is out of sight through the bridge from which it got its name. The starting signal on the right has only the one lens in the spectacles, as it showed a white light in the "all clear" position, something which lasted on the HR until 1903. The home signal, however, has two glasses, as its indication when "off' was a green light for caution; this was a common practice, with the advantage that on the approach to a station the station lights in the background could not be confused for an indication of a home signal.<br /> <br /> Notice the occupation crossing where the two men are standing, with the corresponding break in the ticket platform. This was less inconvenient that it appears at first sight, for the public were not allowed to use the platform, which was just for the ticket collectors' convenience. (They would walk out from Inverness when a train was due.) <br /> <br /> At the far end of the platform is a junction signal, and beyond it a facing crossover. The right hand signal governed movements onto the 'wrong" line, which in turn gave access to some of the platforms at Inverness station, and also to the single line connection to the Far North and to a branch to Inverness Harbour. This was fundamentally remodelled in 1898 when the direct line to Aviemore opened throughout. The house on the left was also swept away in the changes shortly after this photo was taken. Its interest, however, lies in its having been the home of David Jones, the HR's Locomotive Superintendent. Like a lot of the senior officers of the company, Jones occupied the post for many years, relinquishing it in 1896 after sustaining an accident while out on the line.<br /> <br /> The photographer is standing about the place where Millburn Junction later came to be, with Raigmore level crossing fifty yards or so behind. The left hand line has now been lifted to make room for the road which encroaches from the left, and on the right there is now the low embankment of the direct line to Aviemore. There is now no feature at all of the railway which has remained unaltered except the line of the right hand track, which is still where it always was"