Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 06/12/2016
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TIOTAL
Baile Dhubhthaich - Guthan o Linn Eile (8 de 13)
EXTERNAL ID
TDM_ISMAMUNRO_03
ÀITE
Baile Dhubhthaich
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS: Baile Dhubhthaich
DEIT
2005
LINN
2000an
CRUTHADAIR
Isma Munro
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Taigh-tasgaidh Sgìreil Bhaile Dhubhthaich
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
3087
KEYWORDS
clàraidhean-fuaim: An Dara Cogadh

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Tha an clàradh-fuaimseo na phàirt de phròiseact air an Dara Cogadh a rinn Taigh-TasgaidhUlapul agus Bunsgoil Ulapul. Chaidh

'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' a chlàradh ann an 2005. 'S e Isma Rothach an tè a thathar a' ceasnachadh anns an earrainn seo.



'A somewhat strange thing happened in my native village of Braemar one Saturday evening in September 1941. I was away that weekend but I heard all about it when I came home. It had been arranged that the warning for invasion would be the ringing of the bell of the West Church as its was the loudest of the four church bells. That evening the warning came and the bell was rung. The people were panic-stricken and all those, such as the Home Guard, went to their posts. My father, who was a part-time fireman, went to the fire station and told the family to lock the door as soon as he'd gone out and not to open it for anyone. He told me afterwards that he had wished at the time that he had a rifle. He had been a sniper for a time during World War I. The Roman Catholic chapel bell was to be rung for the warning of gas. Now, the man responsible for this had been having a drink or two in one of the pubs and when he heard the church bell ring he set off for the chapel and rang that bell. This, of course, added to the fear and consternation among the people, some of whom then put their gasmasks on. I'm not sure how long this panic lasted, while people sat in darkness and in terror, and in some gases wearing gasmasks, but eventually the message of 'all clear' came through and the air raid wardens went out with their whistles, as they did when the 'all clear' for an air raid came through. Meantime I was spending the weekend in Aberdeen blissfully unaware of all this panic as no invasion warning had arrived there. Later, we learned that the only other place to receive the warning of invasion that evening was another Aberdeenshire village, namely Tarland. We never learned why this warning was sent out but as messages were all in code in wartime it was certainly not a hoaxer who could have been responsible.'

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Baile Dhubhthaich - Guthan o Linn Eile (8 de 13)

ROS: Baile Dhubhthaich

2000an

clàraidhean-fuaim: An Dara Cogadh

Taigh-tasgaidh Sgìreil Bhaile Dhubhthaich

Voices From Their Past - Tain

Tha an clàradh-fuaimseo na phàirt de phròiseact air an Dara Cogadh a rinn Taigh-TasgaidhUlapul agus Bunsgoil Ulapul. Chaidh<br /><br /> 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' a chlàradh ann an 2005. 'S e Isma Rothach an tè a thathar a' ceasnachadh anns an earrainn seo.<br /><br /> <br /><br /> 'A somewhat strange thing happened in my native village of Braemar one Saturday evening in September 1941. I was away that weekend but I heard all about it when I came home. It had been arranged that the warning for invasion would be the ringing of the bell of the West Church as its was the loudest of the four church bells. That evening the warning came and the bell was rung. The people were panic-stricken and all those, such as the Home Guard, went to their posts. My father, who was a part-time fireman, went to the fire station and told the family to lock the door as soon as he'd gone out and not to open it for anyone. He told me afterwards that he had wished at the time that he had a rifle. He had been a sniper for a time during World War I. The Roman Catholic chapel bell was to be rung for the warning of gas. Now, the man responsible for this had been having a drink or two in one of the pubs and when he heard the church bell ring he set off for the chapel and rang that bell. This, of course, added to the fear and consternation among the people, some of whom then put their gasmasks on. I'm not sure how long this panic lasted, while people sat in darkness and in terror, and in some gases wearing gasmasks, but eventually the message of 'all clear' came through and the air raid wardens went out with their whistles, as they did when the 'all clear' for an air raid came through. Meantime I was spending the weekend in Aberdeen blissfully unaware of all this panic as no invasion warning had arrived there. Later, we learned that the only other place to receive the warning of invasion that evening was another Aberdeenshire village, namely Tarland. We never learned why this warning was sent out but as messages were all in code in wartime it was certainly not a hoaxer who could have been responsible.'