Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 21/03/2017
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TIOTAL
Baile Dhubhthaich - Guthan o Linn Eile (11 de 13)
EXTERNAL ID
TDM_PAULLIPPOK_03
ÀITE
Baile Dhubhthaich
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS: Baile Dhubhthaich
DEIT
2005
LINN
2000an
CRUTHADAIR
Paul Lippok
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Taigh-tasgaidh Sgìreil Bhaile Dhubhthaich
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
3092
KEYWORDS
clàraidhean-fuaim: An Dara Cogadh

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Tha an clàradh-fuaimseo na phàirt de phròiseact air an Dara Cogadh a rinn Taigh-TasgaidhUlapul agus Bunsgoil Ulapul. Chaidh
'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' a chlàradh ann an 2005. 'S e Pòl Lippok am fear a thathar a' ceasnachadh anns an earrainn seo.

'Now, you may wonder what made me stay in Tain all that time, finally to be my home. The county of Silesia where I was born, in northern Germany, the eastern part, where at the Yalta Conference agreed by Stalin on his insistence would be annexed to Poland which meant the - probably the first real ethnic cleansing that the population, the German population, were had to be sent to Western Germany and resettled there. Now I did not live through that because Silesia was overrun by the Russians but we were able to follow it in the States by receiving the newspapers. That paid - it meant that I didn't know where my father or mother or family were alive or where they were. Eventually we discovered, while still a prisoner - I had a letter from my brother that he managed to escape to the western part, in northern Germany - and the good news was that all of our - my sister and my parents were alive. My parents were not allowed to leave at that time because my father was a key worker in the quarry, and my sister resettled in the southern Germany. My brother mentioned the situation in Germany after the war - the chaos and all that sort of thing. We were offered to - even before being demobbed which happened a year and a half afterward in 1947 - if the farmer had a place for a prisoner he could take the prisoner in, although he was still a prisoner, as long as you reported at the weekends at the camp you were still here. The family were extremely kind to me. In fact, Mrs. Munro became probably my foster mother. I lived in with the family and, as fate would have it, I can't really put my finger onto it, but it must be the surrounding, the people itself, of Tain, that made me decide, yes, I would stay and make it my home.'

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Baile Dhubhthaich - Guthan o Linn Eile (11 de 13)

ROS: Baile Dhubhthaich

2000an

clàraidhean-fuaim: An Dara Cogadh

Taigh-tasgaidh Sgìreil Bhaile Dhubhthaich

Voices From Their Past - Tain

Tha an clàradh-fuaimseo na phàirt de phròiseact air an Dara Cogadh a rinn Taigh-TasgaidhUlapul agus Bunsgoil Ulapul. Chaidh<br /> 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' a chlàradh ann an 2005. 'S e Pòl Lippok am fear a thathar a' ceasnachadh anns an earrainn seo.<br /> <br /> 'Now, you may wonder what made me stay in Tain all that time, finally to be my home. The county of Silesia where I was born, in northern Germany, the eastern part, where at the Yalta Conference agreed by Stalin on his insistence would be annexed to Poland which meant the - probably the first real ethnic cleansing that the population, the German population, were had to be sent to Western Germany and resettled there. Now I did not live through that because Silesia was overrun by the Russians but we were able to follow it in the States by receiving the newspapers. That paid - it meant that I didn't know where my father or mother or family were alive or where they were. Eventually we discovered, while still a prisoner - I had a letter from my brother that he managed to escape to the western part, in northern Germany - and the good news was that all of our - my sister and my parents were alive. My parents were not allowed to leave at that time because my father was a key worker in the quarry, and my sister resettled in the southern Germany. My brother mentioned the situation in Germany after the war - the chaos and all that sort of thing. We were offered to - even before being demobbed which happened a year and a half afterward in 1947 - if the farmer had a place for a prisoner he could take the prisoner in, although he was still a prisoner, as long as you reported at the weekends at the camp you were still here. The family were extremely kind to me. In fact, Mrs. Munro became probably my foster mother. I lived in with the family and, as fate would have it, I can't really put my finger onto it, but it must be the surrounding, the people itself, of Tain, that made me decide, yes, I would stay and make it my home.'