Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 21/09/2017
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TIOTAL
Ulapul - Guthan o Linn Eile (12 de 23)
EXTERNAL ID
ULMAUL_VOICES_FROM_PAST_12
ÀITE
Ullapul
SGÌRE
Loch Bhraoin
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS: Loch Bhraoin
DEIT
2005
LINN
2000an
CRUTHADAIR
Donnie MacKenzie & Mary MacKenzie
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Taigh-tasgaidh Ulapuil
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
3115
KEYWORDS
clàraidhean-fuaim: An Dara Cogadh
roinneadh

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Tha an clàradh-fuaimseo na phàirt de phròiseact air an Dara Cogadh a rinn Taigh-TasgaidhUlapul agus Bunsgoil Ulapul. Chaidh
'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' a chlàradh ann an 2005. Tha Màiri is Dòmhnall MacCoinnich gan ceasnachadh le cloinn o Bhunsgoil Ulapul.

Màiri: Now, this is one [ration book] I was issued with when I was sixteen. I can't remember what colour they were when they were issued to begin with

Dòmhnall: They were cream coloured.

Màiri: Cream colour.

Dòmhnall, Aye, aye.

Màiri: Well, this one was issued when I was sixteen and the interesting thing about that was, that was just at the end of the war, and if you had a blue ration book the first bananas that came into the country, each person with one of these got four bananas. And I was actually working in Inverness telephone exchange at the time and my landlady got me four bananas and I could remember what bananas were like, you see, before the war, so I just went wild and I ate the four and I have never been so ill in my life. I didn't share them with anybody. After that, of course, they became available again. So that's my ID card. What's the date on it, this one, when I was sixteen? September 1944. Well, there we are - that's an ID card, and we all had them. Now, if you wanted to go to Inverness there was a barrier across the road, at Muir of Ord, and you were stopped and soldiers came to the car or bus, or whatever you were in, and you had to produce your identity card; if you hadn't got it you had to go back home to Ullapool. And it was the same going the other way to Kyle. In fact, you had to have a special visa thing, I suppose you would call it, to have on the train going to Kyle because there was a lot of troops out in Kyle; a lot of air force boys and it was a Polish camp. I can still tell you the telephone number of it - it was Callanish 202. I remember that from my telephone exchange days.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Ulapul - Guthan o Linn Eile (12 de 23)

ROS: Loch Bhraoin

2000an

clàraidhean-fuaim: An Dara Cogadh; roinneadh

Taigh-tasgaidh Ulapuil

Voices From Their Past - Ullapool

Tha an clàradh-fuaimseo na phàirt de phròiseact air an Dara Cogadh a rinn Taigh-TasgaidhUlapul agus Bunsgoil Ulapul. Chaidh<br /> 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' a chlàradh ann an 2005. Tha Màiri is Dòmhnall MacCoinnich gan ceasnachadh le cloinn o Bhunsgoil Ulapul.<br /> <br /> Màiri: Now, this is one [ration book] I was issued with when I was sixteen. I can't remember what colour they were when they were issued to begin with<br /> <br /> Dòmhnall: They were cream coloured.<br /> <br /> Màiri: Cream colour.<br /> <br /> Dòmhnall, Aye, aye.<br /> <br /> Màiri: Well, this one was issued when I was sixteen and the interesting thing about that was, that was just at the end of the war, and if you had a blue ration book the first bananas that came into the country, each person with one of these got four bananas. And I was actually working in Inverness telephone exchange at the time and my landlady got me four bananas and I could remember what bananas were like, you see, before the war, so I just went wild and I ate the four and I have never been so ill in my life. I didn't share them with anybody. After that, of course, they became available again. So that's my ID card. What's the date on it, this one, when I was sixteen? September 1944. Well, there we are - that's an ID card, and we all had them. Now, if you wanted to go to Inverness there was a barrier across the road, at Muir of Ord, and you were stopped and soldiers came to the car or bus, or whatever you were in, and you had to produce your identity card; if you hadn't got it you had to go back home to Ullapool. And it was the same going the other way to Kyle. In fact, you had to have a special visa thing, I suppose you would call it, to have on the train going to Kyle because there was a lot of troops out in Kyle; a lot of air force boys and it was a Polish camp. I can still tell you the telephone number of it - it was Callanish 202. I remember that from my telephone exchange days.