Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 21/03/2017
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TIOTAL
Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (4 de 32)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_ALASDAIR_CAMERON_01_04
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS
DEIT
2010
LINN
2010an
CRUTHADAIR
Alasdair Cameron
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
41069
KEYWORDS
claistinneach
àiteachas
tuathanas
tuathanasan
bailtean
àitean-còmhnaidh
taighean

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San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air diofar sgìre ann an Oighreachd Baile Dhonnchaidh (Rosehaugh), nam measg Uachdar -chlò agus Bog an t-Sràth (Pookandraw).

Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.

Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)

AC: Some things are seen as more important than others, that it's flagged out in some places that there is a telephone installed. I think there's only two telephones in the whole catalogue. I'm looking at the one of the Bog of Auchterflow and that it's got a typical farmhouse for the estate, quite a distinctive pattern, which features in quite a few of them, but the main buildings there have not altered terribly much but there is some additions to it.

CM: Can you tell us more about the distinctive pattern, Alasdair?

AC: Basically it's what planners call today a one-and-a-half storey but they have a distinctive front where there's a, basically it forms a porch that goes up to roof level. I suppose it's like a, like a dormer. Some have a window in it; some have a little circular window. Sometimes the internal layout has a stair in that feature and in some it's been converted to an upstairs bathroom.

The sort of things that crop up is, you see patterns in the field that give you an idea of how the grain was sown and harvested, and that you get different patterns in the stubble according to whether it was cut with a binder, whether it was sown by being broadcast, in which case the stubble is random, or sown with a drill, in which case you can see lines in the stubble.

CM: And when you talk about broadcasting are you talking about the manual broadcasts?

AC: It could be but there's, there is a machine which still crops up today which is officially called a 'broadcaster', but in farming circles it's always referred to as a 'broadcast'. It is basically a machine with long, long boxes and lots of holes, and an agitator inside that drizzles the seed; there's no attempt to cover the seed, it's just scattered there and it would be covered by a harrow. In some areas it's still referred to as a 'grass-seed barrow', although it was used for much more seeds than grass seed. The reason why it's called a grass-seed barrow is that, the original ones were quite small and were basically driven along the field by a strong chap. It had a wheel like a wheelbarrow and it, it had a small box for scattering the seed so, even when it's something that is probably about - I think they would've been twenty feet wide - in some parts of the country it's still referred to as a grass-seed barrow.

There's some wonderful names which we're not totally sure the derivation. One that I'm looking at is Pookandraw, lots of arguments as to where that one came from.

CM: And where, where on the estate is Pookandraw?

AC: Pookandraw is to the north of the community known as Killen.

CM: And do you know about some of the, the justification for the name? Do you know about the theory behind it?

AC: I don't the theories of that one. The other one I'm looking at just now is the farm of Killen which is still very much there today. One of the features that has definitely not changed is the concrete tower silo with a castellated top on it. If you wanted to move one it's extremely difficult. I know that there was an attempt made to remove one in the Muir of Ord area at one stage but they tried various methods and gave up and it's still standing today.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (4 de 32)

ROS

2010an

claistinneach; àiteachas; tuathanas; tuathanasan; bailtean; àitean-còmhnaidh; taighean;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air diofar sgìre ann an Oighreachd Baile Dhonnchaidh (Rosehaugh), nam measg Uachdar -chlò agus Bog an t-Sràth (Pookandraw).<br /> <br /> Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.<br /> <br /> Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> AC: Some things are seen as more important than others, that it's flagged out in some places that there is a telephone installed. I think there's only two telephones in the whole catalogue. I'm looking at the one of the Bog of Auchterflow and that it's got a typical farmhouse for the estate, quite a distinctive pattern, which features in quite a few of them, but the main buildings there have not altered terribly much but there is some additions to it.<br /> <br /> CM: Can you tell us more about the distinctive pattern, Alasdair? <br /> <br /> AC: Basically it's what planners call today a one-and-a-half storey but they have a distinctive front where there's a, basically it forms a porch that goes up to roof level. I suppose it's like a, like a dormer. Some have a window in it; some have a little circular window. Sometimes the internal layout has a stair in that feature and in some it's been converted to an upstairs bathroom. <br /> <br /> The sort of things that crop up is, you see patterns in the field that give you an idea of how the grain was sown and harvested, and that you get different patterns in the stubble according to whether it was cut with a binder, whether it was sown by being broadcast, in which case the stubble is random, or sown with a drill, in which case you can see lines in the stubble.<br /> <br /> CM: And when you talk about broadcasting are you talking about the manual broadcasts?<br /> <br /> AC: It could be but there's, there is a machine which still crops up today which is officially called a 'broadcaster', but in farming circles it's always referred to as a 'broadcast'. It is basically a machine with long, long boxes and lots of holes, and an agitator inside that drizzles the seed; there's no attempt to cover the seed, it's just scattered there and it would be covered by a harrow. In some areas it's still referred to as a 'grass-seed barrow', although it was used for much more seeds than grass seed. The reason why it's called a grass-seed barrow is that, the original ones were quite small and were basically driven along the field by a strong chap. It had a wheel like a wheelbarrow and it, it had a small box for scattering the seed so, even when it's something that is probably about - I think they would've been twenty feet wide - in some parts of the country it's still referred to as a grass-seed barrow.<br /> <br /> There's some wonderful names which we're not totally sure the derivation. One that I'm looking at is Pookandraw, lots of arguments as to where that one came from.<br /> <br /> CM: And where, where on the estate is Pookandraw?<br /> <br /> AC: Pookandraw is to the north of the community known as Killen.<br /> <br /> CM: And do you know about some of the, the justification for the name? Do you know about the theory behind it?<br /> <br /> AC: I don't the theories of that one. The other one I'm looking at just now is the farm of Killen which is still very much there today. One of the features that has definitely not changed is the concrete tower silo with a castellated top on it. If you wanted to move one it's extremely difficult. I know that there was an attempt made to remove one in the Muir of Ord area at one stage but they tried various methods and gave up and it's still standing today.