Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 21/09/2017
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TIOTAL
Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (7 de 32)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_ALASDAIR_CAMERON_01_07
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS
DEIT
2010
LINN
2010an
CRUTHADAIR
Alasdair Cameron
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
41072
KEYWORDS
claistinneach
àiteachas
tuathanas
tuathanasan
bailtean
àitean-còmhnaidh
taighean

Get Adobe Flash player

San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air cuibhleachan-uisge air an Eilean Dubh.

Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.

Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)

AC: The Agricultural Executive Committee had a pool of machinery which was based in Dingwall and that they had mostly American Ford tractors and all the associated equipment, and a team that would go to farms and plough them up, plough up as much as possible, grow potatoes and grain, anything to feed the country. That the equipment was available to hire to any farmer that wished to hire it as well. They would also have things like binders, full title 'reaper binders,' that cut the grain and produced sheaves which are then formed into stooks, and then stacks, and would eventually be thrashed probably by the local thrashing mill with the outfit or occasionally some of the farms noted here have a thrashing mill in the building. Some of these I suspect from the references to the buildings had water power for the thrashing mills so there was quite a lot of waterwheels on the Black Isle.

CM: What, does it mention that the, that the waterwheels, does it mention that in the catalogue or are you inferring that from?

AC: No I've, some of that I've gained from looking at the actual sites ...

CM: Mmm-hmm.

AC: ... and in some cases you can see the signs, or even on the map in some cases, there's a mill dam and also if you look in the side of the building you'll find that somewhere there may be evidence of a waterwheel, circular scars on the wall where it's been rubbing, a deep pit, a water supply, ashlar stone building, because you needed the best possible stone right next to your waterwheel, so that often features. And in some cases there was a concrete mill lade which guided the water at the correct level onto the waterwheel and I find it quite amusing looking at some of the farms that still have the concrete mill lade, which was their source of power in its day, and in three locations I'm aware of, they've got their fuel tanks on top of it because it's at a convenient height to give gravity feed to top up their tractors. So the same lump of concrete is still providing the power source, but in a slightly different direction.

CM: And just for those who may not be familiar with the workings of a mill, the lade would be directing water from the nearest natural water source, so from the burn?

AC: Yes, there would probably be a dam involved somewhere and a sluice that you opened and possibly to divert the water onto the waterwheel when you required the power. The power could be used for various farm uses; it could be driving a turnip cutter or a roller that, for crushing grain, commonly called a 'bruiser', and that in some cases even driving a milk churn has been known that waterwheel has been used for that. Even to provide a small amount of electric power for lighting purposes, within a steading, did happen in a few locations.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
Powered by Capture

Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (7 de 32)

ROS

2010an

claistinneach; àiteachas; tuathanas; tuathanasan; bailtean; àitean-còmhnaidh; taighean;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air cuibhleachan-uisge air an Eilean Dubh.<br /> <br /> Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.<br /> <br /> Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> AC: The Agricultural Executive Committee had a pool of machinery which was based in Dingwall and that they had mostly American Ford tractors and all the associated equipment, and a team that would go to farms and plough them up, plough up as much as possible, grow potatoes and grain, anything to feed the country. That the equipment was available to hire to any farmer that wished to hire it as well. They would also have things like binders, full title 'reaper binders,' that cut the grain and produced sheaves which are then formed into stooks, and then stacks, and would eventually be thrashed probably by the local thrashing mill with the outfit or occasionally some of the farms noted here have a thrashing mill in the building. Some of these I suspect from the references to the buildings had water power for the thrashing mills so there was quite a lot of waterwheels on the Black Isle.<br /> <br /> CM: What, does it mention that the, that the waterwheels, does it mention that in the catalogue or are you inferring that from?<br /> <br /> AC: No I've, some of that I've gained from looking at the actual sites ...<br /> <br /> CM: Mmm-hmm.<br /> <br /> AC: ... and in some cases you can see the signs, or even on the map in some cases, there's a mill dam and also if you look in the side of the building you'll find that somewhere there may be evidence of a waterwheel, circular scars on the wall where it's been rubbing, a deep pit, a water supply, ashlar stone building, because you needed the best possible stone right next to your waterwheel, so that often features. And in some cases there was a concrete mill lade which guided the water at the correct level onto the waterwheel and I find it quite amusing looking at some of the farms that still have the concrete mill lade, which was their source of power in its day, and in three locations I'm aware of, they've got their fuel tanks on top of it because it's at a convenient height to give gravity feed to top up their tractors. So the same lump of concrete is still providing the power source, but in a slightly different direction.<br /> <br /> CM: And just for those who may not be familiar with the workings of a mill, the lade would be directing water from the nearest natural water source, so from the burn?<br /> <br /> AC: Yes, there would probably be a dam involved somewhere and a sluice that you opened and possibly to divert the water onto the waterwheel when you required the power. The power could be used for various farm uses; it could be driving a turnip cutter or a roller that, for crushing grain, commonly called a 'bruiser', and that in some cases even driving a milk churn has been known that waterwheel has been used for that. Even to provide a small amount of electric power for lighting purposes, within a steading, did happen in a few locations.