Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 21/09/2017
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TIOTAL
Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (8 de 32)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_ALASDAIR_CAMERON_01_08
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS
DEIT
2010
LINN
2010an
CRUTHADAIR
Alasdair Cameron
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
41073
KEYWORDS
claistinneach
àiteachas
tuathanas
tuathanasan
bailtean
àitean-còmhnaidh
taighean

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San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air diofar thuathanas air an Eilean Dubh. Tha iomradh aige cuideachd air Feachd Canàdianach an Fhiodh aig àm an Dàrna Cogaidh.

Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.

Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)

AC: The other one I'm looking at on the same page is Burn Farm and that the magic phrase that's there is 'the farm buildings are converted and occupied by Her Majesty's Forces.' Now another investigation I've been doing is into the Canadian Timber Corps operating in this area in World War Two and Burn Farm was one of their most important bases in the Black Isle. It goes under various names which has caused a bit of confusion because it was a sawmill but it was also major workshops, and that they held a lot of engineering equipment there and supplies of material that was used to repair and maintain the other sawmills they had in the area.

CM: So Burn Farm, just to locate it on the Black Isle, Alasdair, in which area?

AC: Right, it's, the other names I should give you it's, it's sometimes referred to as Rosehaugh in the military and also Bog of Shannon, so it's between Killen and the Rosehaugh farm buildings. And that I'm not quite sure why they chose that site; it didn't look like an obvious but it may've been there was a lot more timber around the area than there is now. There was probably another two sites on the Black Isle, at Fortrose and Rosemarkie Eathie. I'm still investigating the exact locations of these, but there was certainly a big quantity of timber sent from, by boat from Cromarty, and by rail from Fortrose and Avoch, for the war effort. A lot would be in the form of pit props.

I'm looking at the farm of Cloy. Nothing unusual about it; a very standard set of plans for the house again and that it doesn't have anything exciting like a telephone, fairly standard. Maybe something that is different is it had a tractor shed. Now, a tractor shed was quite a feature in those days because we were generally talking of about horsepower so that was probably the must-have thing, a tractor shed.

CM: And would that, do you imagine, would that have been purpose built then? Or re-used?

AC: No, I think it may've been just purpose-built because at that period, I know from some of the vintage tractor enthusiasts, who still have tractors of that period, even restored to the best possible condition, they are difficult to start at times. So, I think it would be essential to keep them under cover, to keep the electrics as dry as possible, so I think a tractor shed would've been something that would be quite an important thing to have in those days, much more so than it would be nowadays.

What's caught my eye on this page is Killen Smithy, because smithies were very important because if you had a horse it needed shoes. The local pronunciation would always be 'smiddy' but the official best-English technique was 'smithy', and this was one of many in the Black Isle area. There's not much trace of it actually today, it's simply a house; it's part of something that happens in the countryside these days quite a lot that farms buildings converted into living accommodation. Occasionally it's the other way round that some farm cottages were converted into farm buildings but such is demand for building sites, and permission to build in the Black Isle area these days, that any farm building is at a premium if it's possible to convert it into a house.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (8 de 32)

ROS

2010an

claistinneach; àiteachas; tuathanas; tuathanasan; bailtean; àitean-còmhnaidh; taighean;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air diofar thuathanas air an Eilean Dubh. Tha iomradh aige cuideachd air Feachd Canàdianach an Fhiodh aig àm an Dàrna Cogaidh.<br /> <br /> Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.<br /> <br /> Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> AC: The other one I'm looking at on the same page is Burn Farm and that the magic phrase that's there is 'the farm buildings are converted and occupied by Her Majesty's Forces.' Now another investigation I've been doing is into the Canadian Timber Corps operating in this area in World War Two and Burn Farm was one of their most important bases in the Black Isle. It goes under various names which has caused a bit of confusion because it was a sawmill but it was also major workshops, and that they held a lot of engineering equipment there and supplies of material that was used to repair and maintain the other sawmills they had in the area.<br /> <br /> CM: So Burn Farm, just to locate it on the Black Isle, Alasdair, in which area?<br /> <br /> AC: Right, it's, the other names I should give you it's, it's sometimes referred to as Rosehaugh in the military and also Bog of Shannon, so it's between Killen and the Rosehaugh farm buildings. And that I'm not quite sure why they chose that site; it didn't look like an obvious but it may've been there was a lot more timber around the area than there is now. There was probably another two sites on the Black Isle, at Fortrose and Rosemarkie Eathie. I'm still investigating the exact locations of these, but there was certainly a big quantity of timber sent from, by boat from Cromarty, and by rail from Fortrose and Avoch, for the war effort. A lot would be in the form of pit props. <br /> <br /> I'm looking at the farm of Cloy. Nothing unusual about it; a very standard set of plans for the house again and that it doesn't have anything exciting like a telephone, fairly standard. Maybe something that is different is it had a tractor shed. Now, a tractor shed was quite a feature in those days because we were generally talking of about horsepower so that was probably the must-have thing, a tractor shed. <br /> <br /> CM: And would that, do you imagine, would that have been purpose built then? Or re-used?<br /> <br /> AC: No, I think it may've been just purpose-built because at that period, I know from some of the vintage tractor enthusiasts, who still have tractors of that period, even restored to the best possible condition, they are difficult to start at times. So, I think it would be essential to keep them under cover, to keep the electrics as dry as possible, so I think a tractor shed would've been something that would be quite an important thing to have in those days, much more so than it would be nowadays.<br /> <br /> What's caught my eye on this page is Killen Smithy, because smithies were very important because if you had a horse it needed shoes. The local pronunciation would always be 'smiddy' but the official best-English technique was 'smithy', and this was one of many in the Black Isle area. There's not much trace of it actually today, it's simply a house; it's part of something that happens in the countryside these days quite a lot that farms buildings converted into living accommodation. Occasionally it's the other way round that some farm cottages were converted into farm buildings but such is demand for building sites, and permission to build in the Black Isle area these days, that any farm building is at a premium if it's possible to convert it into a house.