Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 14/07/2017
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TIOTAL
Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (12 de 32)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_ALASDAIR_CAMERON_01_12
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS
DEIT
2010
LINN
2010an
CRUTHADAIR
Alasdair Cameron
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
41077
KEYWORDS
claistinneach
àiteachas
tuathanas
tuathanasan
bailtean
àitean-còmhnaidh
taighean

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San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air diofar sgìre ann an Oighreachd Baile Dhonnchaidh (Rosehaugh), nam measg Smùdanan an Aoil/ Limekilns agus Corr Achaidh.

Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.

Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)

AC: 'A pleasant holding known as Limekilns'. I've been trying to find out for quite a while that, why was it called Limekilns? Where's the lime? There's nothing visible nowadays. However, one of the local contractors who was doing a water scheme there a number of years ago, and he was actually a very interesting geologist as a hobby, I cross-examined him and they said 'oh we're putting in deep trenches, of course there's lime there. It's just that all the easily-worked stuff has been worked and it's still there below the surface', so there actually is quite a bit of limestone in the Black Isle. One of the ways of seeing the bulk of it is if you look at the SNH map of the Sites of Special Scientific Interest because mostly they're based over limestone where the vegetation is particularly interesting due to the high lime content. There's another area near to the farm of Belmaduthy where lime was mentioned as being worked there but nothing other than the name left at Limekilns.

CM: And just to locate Limekilns in the Black Isle, em ...

AC: Right, it's about halfway between Fortrose and Killen. Killen is a fairly small village. Historically it was said to be a village of weavers. It's got a school and some buildings that were built by the Rosehaugh Estate, some rather attractive single-storey houses there. I'm looking at the farm of Crosshills, a smallholding. What I noticed here in the text is it's got a chalmer. Now that is one of the many terms for a bothy which is where the farm workers, unmarried farm workers, would be accommodated. Now, they probably slept there but were probably fed in the, in the farm kitchen.

CM: And it's curious that, of course, chalmer, as in the name, it's c-h-a-l-m-e-r.

AC: Yes.

CM: Do you think that there might be a connection between the ...

AC: I don't know,

CM: ... the personal name?

AC: Quite possible. We're looking at Corrachy that's got a phone. Now, on the first line 'it's on the western march of the estate to the south of the railway.' Now, the railway was important because at the bottom of the road leading up the hill to Corrachy, it's more or less opposite the Rosehaugh Estate buildings and house, and there's a level crossing. And actually relatives of my grandmother's stayed in that house, by the name of MacLeay, and that I think the house was probably rent free provided you opened and closed the gates. I know one of them worked on the railway so that was a common deal, and it's still referred to as Corrachy Crossings although the railway has long since gone. But it was much more than a crossings because it was also the private halt for the Fletchers of Rosehaugh and since the Fletchers of Rosehaugh, he was the driving force behind getting a railway to the Black Isle, he was involved with the Highland Railway Company, so if you're at that sort of rank and you want your own private halt, you get it. You may not get it nowadays but that was how it evolved.

CM: It's interesting in the list of, again, the suite of rooms at the building, so that there is a, in the farm house, a sitting room, a dining room, a kitchen, four bedrooms, a boxroom, bathroom and the WC and the telephone, but I don't see a description of, of a place where the Fletchers might wait so, presumably they didn't go into the house?

AC: No. It's the, it's the farm I'm talking about the, but the crossing was at the side of the main road leading up to the farm so that when the railway came they had to get a crossing because it was on their main access road, so the house at the crossing is a standard off-the-peg railway house that you can find anywhere there was a railway. I believe, I've looked at a lot of the history of the history of the Black Isle Farmers' Society and that on quite a few occasions the Black Isle Show was held at the policies of Rosehaugh and that on that occasions there was the provision of the train stopping to let the commoners come to the Black Isle Show.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (12 de 32)

ROS

2010an

claistinneach; àiteachas; tuathanas; tuathanasan; bailtean; àitean-còmhnaidh; taighean;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air diofar sgìre ann an Oighreachd Baile Dhonnchaidh (Rosehaugh), nam measg Smùdanan an Aoil/ Limekilns agus Corr Achaidh.<br /> <br /> Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.<br /> <br /> Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> AC: 'A pleasant holding known as Limekilns'. I've been trying to find out for quite a while that, why was it called Limekilns? Where's the lime? There's nothing visible nowadays. However, one of the local contractors who was doing a water scheme there a number of years ago, and he was actually a very interesting geologist as a hobby, I cross-examined him and they said 'oh we're putting in deep trenches, of course there's lime there. It's just that all the easily-worked stuff has been worked and it's still there below the surface', so there actually is quite a bit of limestone in the Black Isle. One of the ways of seeing the bulk of it is if you look at the SNH map of the Sites of Special Scientific Interest because mostly they're based over limestone where the vegetation is particularly interesting due to the high lime content. There's another area near to the farm of Belmaduthy where lime was mentioned as being worked there but nothing other than the name left at Limekilns.<br /> <br /> CM: And just to locate Limekilns in the Black Isle, em ...<br /> <br /> AC: Right, it's about halfway between Fortrose and Killen. Killen is a fairly small village. Historically it was said to be a village of weavers. It's got a school and some buildings that were built by the Rosehaugh Estate, some rather attractive single-storey houses there. I'm looking at the farm of Crosshills, a smallholding. What I noticed here in the text is it's got a chalmer. Now that is one of the many terms for a bothy which is where the farm workers, unmarried farm workers, would be accommodated. Now, they probably slept there but were probably fed in the, in the farm kitchen.<br /> <br /> CM: And it's curious that, of course, chalmer, as in the name, it's c-h-a-l-m-e-r. <br /> <br /> AC: Yes.<br /> <br /> CM: Do you think that there might be a connection between the ...<br /> <br /> AC: I don't know,<br /> <br /> CM: ... the personal name?<br /> <br /> AC: Quite possible. We're looking at Corrachy that's got a phone. Now, on the first line 'it's on the western march of the estate to the south of the railway.' Now, the railway was important because at the bottom of the road leading up the hill to Corrachy, it's more or less opposite the Rosehaugh Estate buildings and house, and there's a level crossing. And actually relatives of my grandmother's stayed in that house, by the name of MacLeay, and that I think the house was probably rent free provided you opened and closed the gates. I know one of them worked on the railway so that was a common deal, and it's still referred to as Corrachy Crossings although the railway has long since gone. But it was much more than a crossings because it was also the private halt for the Fletchers of Rosehaugh and since the Fletchers of Rosehaugh, he was the driving force behind getting a railway to the Black Isle, he was involved with the Highland Railway Company, so if you're at that sort of rank and you want your own private halt, you get it. You may not get it nowadays but that was how it evolved.<br /> <br /> CM: It's interesting in the list of, again, the suite of rooms at the building, so that there is a, in the farm house, a sitting room, a dining room, a kitchen, four bedrooms, a boxroom, bathroom and the WC and the telephone, but I don't see a description of, of a place where the Fletchers might wait so, presumably they didn't go into the house?<br /> <br /> AC: No. It's the, it's the farm I'm talking about the, but the crossing was at the side of the main road leading up to the farm so that when the railway came they had to get a crossing because it was on their main access road, so the house at the crossing is a standard off-the-peg railway house that you can find anywhere there was a railway. I believe, I've looked at a lot of the history of the history of the Black Isle Farmers' Society and that on quite a few occasions the Black Isle Show was held at the policies of Rosehaugh and that on that occasions there was the provision of the train stopping to let the commoners come to the Black Isle Show.