Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 21/09/2017
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TIOTAL
Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (17 de 32)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_ALASDAIR_CAMERON_02_02
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS
DEIT
2010
LINN
2010an
CRUTHADAIR
Alasdair Cameron
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
41082
KEYWORDS
claistinneach
àiteachas
tuathanas
tuathanasan
bailtean
àitean-còmhnaidh
taighean

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San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air grunn annasan ann an ailtireachd agus àiteachas a bh' ann an Abhach.

Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.

Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)

AC: We've got pages and pages of site rents for the Police Station, the Bank House, the Station Hotel, which was a real station hotel because there was a station at Avoch. And we have the lands associated to the different parts of Avoch. The Dock is a distinctive area. Seatown is the bit that runs along the seafront where you've got a long line of cottages and, interesting names of the cottage in the Henrietta, there's Bayview, Seaview, Beach Villa; you can spot where these were. You've also got things like a feu for the Slaughter House so no transport involved in getting your meat. The War Department again had miscellaneous rents. The telephone kiosk was a feu duty of a shilling and certain names point towards what was there. Factory Lane - no factory now but it had quite a long history which is recorded elsewhere.

Various references to the quarry, or quarries, that were in the area. At these periods, there was a lot of quarries because to avoid transport you looked for a source of stone, or sand or gravel, as near to your building as possible, so some of these were actually quite small. There's an interesting one here called Shorelands Field, lying between Avoch, Fortrose Road, and the sea. It's still very visible today. It's overgrown but I do remember it was cultivated on a regular basis. It was a very nice location and was a very good growing area for early potatoes; sheltered, caught the sun, and at this period was let out to Alec Mann on a yearly tenancy of four pounds, five shillings per annum. The other piece on this page is certain annual dry multures, that's m-u-l-t-u-r-e-s, but they were usually pronounced 'mooters'. I don't quite know why but it was basically dues that had to be paid to the miller, and that basically, you were obliged to pay the miller if you didn't take your crop to be ground at the mill, and that the reference here is annual dry multures which was, basically, paying in cash what you would normally have paid the miller by using his services, in which case he would normally be paid by a proportion of the meal that he milled on your behalf, was his payment for the process.

We mentioned telephones before; there's also notes that the Post Office Engineering Department had tenancy for various poles and that came to eight shillings. We also have the new wonder of electricity and the local company at that period were known as the Grampian Electricity Supply Company and that they've got various payments around Tomich, Cromarty and Avoch to the estates.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (17 de 32)

ROS

2010an

claistinneach; àiteachas; tuathanas; tuathanasan; bailtean; àitean-còmhnaidh; taighean;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air grunn annasan ann an ailtireachd agus àiteachas a bh' ann an Abhach.<br /> <br /> Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.<br /> <br /> Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> AC: We've got pages and pages of site rents for the Police Station, the Bank House, the Station Hotel, which was a real station hotel because there was a station at Avoch. And we have the lands associated to the different parts of Avoch. The Dock is a distinctive area. Seatown is the bit that runs along the seafront where you've got a long line of cottages and, interesting names of the cottage in the Henrietta, there's Bayview, Seaview, Beach Villa; you can spot where these were. You've also got things like a feu for the Slaughter House so no transport involved in getting your meat. The War Department again had miscellaneous rents. The telephone kiosk was a feu duty of a shilling and certain names point towards what was there. Factory Lane - no factory now but it had quite a long history which is recorded elsewhere. <br /> <br /> Various references to the quarry, or quarries, that were in the area. At these periods, there was a lot of quarries because to avoid transport you looked for a source of stone, or sand or gravel, as near to your building as possible, so some of these were actually quite small. There's an interesting one here called Shorelands Field, lying between Avoch, Fortrose Road, and the sea. It's still very visible today. It's overgrown but I do remember it was cultivated on a regular basis. It was a very nice location and was a very good growing area for early potatoes; sheltered, caught the sun, and at this period was let out to Alec Mann on a yearly tenancy of four pounds, five shillings per annum. The other piece on this page is certain annual dry multures, that's m-u-l-t-u-r-e-s, but they were usually pronounced 'mooters'. I don't quite know why but it was basically dues that had to be paid to the miller, and that basically, you were obliged to pay the miller if you didn't take your crop to be ground at the mill, and that the reference here is annual dry multures which was, basically, paying in cash what you would normally have paid the miller by using his services, in which case he would normally be paid by a proportion of the meal that he milled on your behalf, was his payment for the process. <br /> <br /> We mentioned telephones before; there's also notes that the Post Office Engineering Department had tenancy for various poles and that came to eight shillings. We also have the new wonder of electricity and the local company at that period were known as the Grampian Electricity Supply Company and that they've got various payments around Tomich, Cromarty and Avoch to the estates.