Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 14/07/2017
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TIOTAL
Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (19 de 32)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_ALASDAIR_CAMERON_02_04
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS
DEIT
2010
LINN
2010an
CRUTHADAIR
Alasdair Cameron
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
41084
KEYWORDS
claistinneach
àiteachas
tuathanas
tuathanasan
bailtean
àitean-còmhnaidh
taighean

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San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air diofar sgìre air an Eilean Dubh, nam measg Àthaigh agus Ceann na Creige.

Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.

Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)

AC: There's a mention of Upper Eathie is significant that it's got a Maid's Room, so you've got to look after your servants. A thrashing barn with a granary over, a four-bay cart shed, engine shed, turnip house, wooden coal shed and a wooden garage. The four-bay cart shed gives an indication of the size of a farm as well as the number of stalls in the stable. There's mention that there's a small byre for three, and a second byre for four, so that's the cows accommodated, and a four-stall stable and obviously that matches up nicely with the four-bay cart shed. So that's quite a routine one. I'm looking at the photograph of the Mains of Eathie again. It doesn't look terribly much different from that today, although at the back of it there's quite a few large buildings which are used for specialist contract pig rearing and I think it's the biggest number of pigs I've ever seen as youngsters there. They come there when they've left their mother and that they are reared and then they move off to the bacon lands after that. But it's purely a contract thing done on a fairly large scale there.

CM: And at the time that the estate catalogue being produced, what were they farming?

AC: Yes, well, they were maybe slightly different in that they're a hundred and sixty-seven acres, and it's mentioned that they had a feeding byre for twenty. Now that's something that's quite significant because they would be fattening animals. Fat is not a word that's used nowadays - they refer to them as 'finished', don't want to imply that there's fat anywhere - so they would be, that would be a fattening byre where the animals were kept in stalls, and fed as much as they would eat, purely for beef production. It's not mentioned in many of the other farms so it's thought to be significant. Three-bay cart shed, hen house, workshop, garage and stable for six. The hen house is something that causes confusion because nowadays supermarkets have invented the chicken concept, whereas in the rural areas hens supply eggs, whereas supermarkets, everything is a chicken.

We've got Craighead, which is a smaller farm, a hundred and seven acres, and it's notable because it's got a milk house so obviously we're talking of dairy production here. A byre for fourteen, that's probably one of the biggest byres that's for cows rather than a fattening byre. Three wooden piggeries, so that's something that was obviously going on in Craighead. It's a beautiful situation, high, exposed, wonderful view, as are most of the farms on the road from Rosemarkie, by Eathie, towards Cromarty, and we've got the lands of Learnie and Berryhill. Well, I think Berryhill speaks for itself and I think you can do some summer picking there still. It's become known nationally, and maybe internationally now, because Learnie is the site of a Mountain Bike course where suicidal people go down steep slopes and it's quite an attraction, and various competitions held there and it's quite a busy site, helped a lot by the Forestry Commission who were keen to develop it.

CM: Is there still a working farm at Learnie or ...?

AC: Yes, there is and there's actually a Forestry Commission quarry there which has quite a distinctive rock. It's not a hard rock but it's very good road material and the Forestry Commission have used a big tonnage of that for their forest roads.

CM: And is that what is sometimes referred to locally as 'rotten rock'?

AC: Yes, yes.

CM: Uh-huh. The old red sandstone?

AC: It wasn't quite into that stage then.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (19 de 32)

ROS

2010an

claistinneach; àiteachas; tuathanas; tuathanasan; bailtean; àitean-còmhnaidh; taighean;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air diofar sgìre air an Eilean Dubh, nam measg Àthaigh agus Ceann na Creige.<br /> <br /> Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.<br /> <br /> Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> AC: There's a mention of Upper Eathie is significant that it's got a Maid's Room, so you've got to look after your servants. A thrashing barn with a granary over, a four-bay cart shed, engine shed, turnip house, wooden coal shed and a wooden garage. The four-bay cart shed gives an indication of the size of a farm as well as the number of stalls in the stable. There's mention that there's a small byre for three, and a second byre for four, so that's the cows accommodated, and a four-stall stable and obviously that matches up nicely with the four-bay cart shed. So that's quite a routine one. I'm looking at the photograph of the Mains of Eathie again. It doesn't look terribly much different from that today, although at the back of it there's quite a few large buildings which are used for specialist contract pig rearing and I think it's the biggest number of pigs I've ever seen as youngsters there. They come there when they've left their mother and that they are reared and then they move off to the bacon lands after that. But it's purely a contract thing done on a fairly large scale there.<br /> <br /> CM: And at the time that the estate catalogue being produced, what were they farming?<br /> <br /> AC: Yes, well, they were maybe slightly different in that they're a hundred and sixty-seven acres, and it's mentioned that they had a feeding byre for twenty. Now that's something that's quite significant because they would be fattening animals. Fat is not a word that's used nowadays - they refer to them as 'finished', don't want to imply that there's fat anywhere - so they would be, that would be a fattening byre where the animals were kept in stalls, and fed as much as they would eat, purely for beef production. It's not mentioned in many of the other farms so it's thought to be significant. Three-bay cart shed, hen house, workshop, garage and stable for six. The hen house is something that causes confusion because nowadays supermarkets have invented the chicken concept, whereas in the rural areas hens supply eggs, whereas supermarkets, everything is a chicken.<br /> <br /> We've got Craighead, which is a smaller farm, a hundred and seven acres, and it's notable because it's got a milk house so obviously we're talking of dairy production here. A byre for fourteen, that's probably one of the biggest byres that's for cows rather than a fattening byre. Three wooden piggeries, so that's something that was obviously going on in Craighead. It's a beautiful situation, high, exposed, wonderful view, as are most of the farms on the road from Rosemarkie, by Eathie, towards Cromarty, and we've got the lands of Learnie and Berryhill. Well, I think Berryhill speaks for itself and I think you can do some summer picking there still. It's become known nationally, and maybe internationally now, because Learnie is the site of a Mountain Bike course where suicidal people go down steep slopes and it's quite an attraction, and various competitions held there and it's quite a busy site, helped a lot by the Forestry Commission who were keen to develop it.<br /> <br /> CM: Is there still a working farm at Learnie or ...?<br /> <br /> AC: Yes, there is and there's actually a Forestry Commission quarry there which has quite a distinctive rock. It's not a hard rock but it's very good road material and the Forestry Commission have used a big tonnage of that for their forest roads.<br /> <br /> CM: And is that what is sometimes referred to locally as 'rotten rock'?<br /> <br /> AC: Yes, yes.<br /> <br /> CM: Uh-huh. The old red sandstone?<br /> <br /> AC: It wasn't quite into that stage then.