Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 14/07/2017
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TIOTAL
Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (24 de 32)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_ALASDAIR_CAMERON_02_09
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS
DEIT
2010
LINN
2010an
CRUTHADAIR
Alasdair Cameron
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
41089
KEYWORDS
claistinneach
àiteachas
tuathanas
tuathanasan
bailtean
àitean-còmhnaidh
taighean

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San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air an sgìre mu Bhail' mac Duibh air an Eilean Dubh.

Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.

Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)

AC: Somebody did mention that there was a Belmaduthy curling pond but I think we've actually established that it may not actually have been at Belmaduthy. There's Pond Cottage, and there was a pond there, but we don't think there was actually a purpose-made curling pond. One of the things that I came across when I was looking over the site a few years ago was, a, what looked like a hole in the ground, and once I looked into it, discovered that it was a lid and then I looked down with a torch and, it's a very interesting tunnel which I wasn't brave enough to crawl through, but by shining a light in both directions it would appear to come from the cellars, and that it runs down towards the water course that is clearly marked in blue on the map here. It's ...

CM: So in terms of direction it's to the north?

AC: ... it's running towards where the number 134 is on this map.

CM: Ok, so, north, north-east?

AC: Now, em ...

CM: My apologies. No, North, yes, north-east, that's right isn't it?

AC: It's probably just about, probably just about an easterly direction.

CM: Uh-huh.

AC: What was it for? Well it's obviously more than a drain because you can get through it. It's narrow at the bottom but provided your shoulders weren't too broad I think you could crouch and get along it. Was it an escape? Was it to get water from the burn if you're under siege? I'll leave you to make up your own mind as to what the purpose but it's certainly a fascinating tunnel. Sadly round about it today there's a lot of modern houses but I think the road going in to one of them must go over the top of that tunnel today. I wonder if they're aware of it. The present Belmaduthy farm house is modern. I would think it was mid 50s when it was built. On the higher lands of Belmaduthy there was one of the sources of limestone at one time for the agricultural community but I think the deposit is totally worked out. And it probably had a waterwheel - I haven't examined the buildings closely - because it's got a dam and a dam wood upstream and there certainly would be potential there. I don't think any farm of that size that had a water source would not have a waterwheel.

CM: Have you identified a kiln, a lime kiln at all?

AC: No, no, no. If there were for a small quantity it probably was something that had the stones re-used for something else. Where there's mention of them they seldom survive unless they were a major industry. There's a beautiful one in Kiltarlity that's worth having a look at; that, it's, there's a new house close to it and I think they've almost put their bulk gas tank on top of it which seems strange to my mind.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (24 de 32)

ROS

2010an

claistinneach; àiteachas; tuathanas; tuathanasan; bailtean; àitean-còmhnaidh; taighean;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air an sgìre mu Bhail' mac Duibh air an Eilean Dubh.<br /> <br /> Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.<br /> <br /> Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> AC: Somebody did mention that there was a Belmaduthy curling pond but I think we've actually established that it may not actually have been at Belmaduthy. There's Pond Cottage, and there was a pond there, but we don't think there was actually a purpose-made curling pond. One of the things that I came across when I was looking over the site a few years ago was, a, what looked like a hole in the ground, and once I looked into it, discovered that it was a lid and then I looked down with a torch and, it's a very interesting tunnel which I wasn't brave enough to crawl through, but by shining a light in both directions it would appear to come from the cellars, and that it runs down towards the water course that is clearly marked in blue on the map here. It's ...<br /> <br /> CM: So in terms of direction it's to the north?<br /> <br /> AC: ... it's running towards where the number 134 is on this map.<br /> <br /> CM: Ok, so, north, north-east? <br /> <br /> AC: Now, em ...<br /> <br /> CM: My apologies. No, North, yes, north-east, that's right isn't it?<br /> <br /> AC: It's probably just about, probably just about an easterly direction.<br /> <br /> CM: Uh-huh.<br /> <br /> AC: What was it for? Well it's obviously more than a drain because you can get through it. It's narrow at the bottom but provided your shoulders weren't too broad I think you could crouch and get along it. Was it an escape? Was it to get water from the burn if you're under siege? I'll leave you to make up your own mind as to what the purpose but it's certainly a fascinating tunnel. Sadly round about it today there's a lot of modern houses but I think the road going in to one of them must go over the top of that tunnel today. I wonder if they're aware of it. The present Belmaduthy farm house is modern. I would think it was mid 50s when it was built. On the higher lands of Belmaduthy there was one of the sources of limestone at one time for the agricultural community but I think the deposit is totally worked out. And it probably had a waterwheel - I haven't examined the buildings closely - because it's got a dam and a dam wood upstream and there certainly would be potential there. I don't think any farm of that size that had a water source would not have a waterwheel.<br /> <br /> CM: Have you identified a kiln, a lime kiln at all?<br /> <br /> AC: No, no, no. If there were for a small quantity it probably was something that had the stones re-used for something else. Where there's mention of them they seldom survive unless they were a major industry. There's a beautiful one in Kiltarlity that's worth having a look at; that, it's, there's a new house close to it and I think they've almost put their bulk gas tank on top of it which seems strange to my mind.