Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 22/06/2017
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TIOTAL
Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (25 de 32)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_ALASDAIR_CAMERON_03_01
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS
DEIT
2010
LINN
2010an
CRUTHADAIR
Alasdair Cameron
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
41090
KEYWORDS
claistinneach
àiteachas
tuathanas
tuathanasan
bailtean
àitean-còmhnaidh
taighean

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San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air Rèile an Eilein Duibh, goibhnean san sgìre, cumhachd an uisge agus roth-uidheaman uisge.

Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.

Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)

AC: I'm looking at the Black Isle map here which I think must be based on the first edition but it's got the Black Isle Railway added to it. Sometimes it's confusing because I've come across some very early maps that have the Black Isle Railway added and it's slightly confusing. However, this one is one that I've used because I was interested in the various developments on the Black Isle and that what was important at this period. So, they've marked all the smithies, known in this area, in most of Scotland as a 'smiddy'. And if you're working your farm with horses you've got to feed the horse but you've also to look after the horse shoes and that, there was a regular maintenance required to get new shoes made for your horse, and also they might have to get the shoe removed, the foot dressed and refitted. So, an important part of the community was the smiddy. And that there was ones that are spread over the area but also some of the farms had their own smiddy but the blacksmith came to the farm on the appointed day, rather than take all the horses all the way to his smiddy, which nowadays the travelling blacksmith takes everything in his van, and his forge, and goes to the horse. So, my theory is based on the fact that we've got this distribution of smiddies, and where you've got a smiddy, and also a meal mill, because water power and producing meal from the oats was an important part of the survival of a community, so what came first? Chicken and egg situation. I suspect that some of the sites were developed because the water power was there, and there was a meal mill and the blacksmith starts his business there, and then someone decides 'hey this is a good place to have a pub' so you get settlements with all three, and these are maybe the successful settlements that we have today.

Water power was probably the most important power source in the Black Isle and the central ridge of the Black Isle, principally the Mulbuie Common, had the main water sources and because some of it was peat bog it soaked up the rain and released it on a reasonably regular base. So, you've got a lot of artificial drainage work on the higher land was designed to capture the water and channel it towards your waterwheel. And that's a pattern that exists right around the fringe of the Black Isle.

We've also got the more adventurous folks who went in for the modern technology of having water turbines. Now these were relatively small to look at but, dependent on a piped supply of water that came from a dam at a higher location because they worked on the pressure of the water rather than the volume. And one of the first noted ones was on the Redcastle Estate where they had a turbine driving a generator to provide electricity for the castle and the gardener's house. And it was said that, at that period, the Black Isle was a hundred percent self-sufficient in electricity because they only had two customers. On that water supply at Redcastle there's actually two turbines and a waterwheel. The, the other turbine was used to power the barn machinery on the farm which was fairly close to the castle.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (25 de 32)

ROS

2010an

claistinneach; àiteachas; tuathanas; tuathanasan; bailtean; àitean-còmhnaidh; taighean;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air Rèile an Eilein Duibh, goibhnean san sgìre, cumhachd an uisge agus roth-uidheaman uisge.<br /> <br /> Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.<br /> <br /> Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> AC: I'm looking at the Black Isle map here which I think must be based on the first edition but it's got the Black Isle Railway added to it. Sometimes it's confusing because I've come across some very early maps that have the Black Isle Railway added and it's slightly confusing. However, this one is one that I've used because I was interested in the various developments on the Black Isle and that what was important at this period. So, they've marked all the smithies, known in this area, in most of Scotland as a 'smiddy'. And if you're working your farm with horses you've got to feed the horse but you've also to look after the horse shoes and that, there was a regular maintenance required to get new shoes made for your horse, and also they might have to get the shoe removed, the foot dressed and refitted. So, an important part of the community was the smiddy. And that there was ones that are spread over the area but also some of the farms had their own smiddy but the blacksmith came to the farm on the appointed day, rather than take all the horses all the way to his smiddy, which nowadays the travelling blacksmith takes everything in his van, and his forge, and goes to the horse. So, my theory is based on the fact that we've got this distribution of smiddies, and where you've got a smiddy, and also a meal mill, because water power and producing meal from the oats was an important part of the survival of a community, so what came first? Chicken and egg situation. I suspect that some of the sites were developed because the water power was there, and there was a meal mill and the blacksmith starts his business there, and then someone decides 'hey this is a good place to have a pub' so you get settlements with all three, and these are maybe the successful settlements that we have today.<br /> <br /> Water power was probably the most important power source in the Black Isle and the central ridge of the Black Isle, principally the Mulbuie Common, had the main water sources and because some of it was peat bog it soaked up the rain and released it on a reasonably regular base. So, you've got a lot of artificial drainage work on the higher land was designed to capture the water and channel it towards your waterwheel. And that's a pattern that exists right around the fringe of the Black Isle.<br /> <br /> We've also got the more adventurous folks who went in for the modern technology of having water turbines. Now these were relatively small to look at but, dependent on a piped supply of water that came from a dam at a higher location because they worked on the pressure of the water rather than the volume. And one of the first noted ones was on the Redcastle Estate where they had a turbine driving a generator to provide electricity for the castle and the gardener's house. And it was said that, at that period, the Black Isle was a hundred percent self-sufficient in electricity because they only had two customers. On that water supply at Redcastle there's actually two turbines and a waterwheel. The, the other turbine was used to power the barn machinery on the farm which was fairly close to the castle.