Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 21/09/2017
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TIOTAL
Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (27 de 32)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_ALASDAIR_CAMERON_03_03
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS
DEIT
2010
LINN
2010an
CRUTHADAIR
Alasdair Cameron
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
41092
KEYWORDS
claistinneach
àiteachas
tuathanas
tuathanasan
bailtean
àitean-còmhnaidh
taighean

Get Adobe Flash player

San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air muilnean fo chumhachd na smùid agus mar a dh'atharraich cleachdadh nan togalaichean san tuathanas nuair a thàinig na h-innealan mòra ioma-bhuain a-steach.

Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.

Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)

AC: The other one that I remember is actually visible from where are now at Wellhouse, because just a couple of fields away is Kilcoy Farm, and that Kilcoy Farm had a steam engine but I only remember the brick chimney stack which was demolished, probably early '70s. All that's left of it now is the circular dressed stone that was on the top of it has been retained by one of the Jack family that own the farm, and he's got it in his garden, on the lawn, with roses growing in the middle of it, so it hasn't totally disappeared. I think that's all I can think of on ...

Eh, no, another, another factor that's quite interesting, that I see in farm buildings is the different ages of power and there's one that I remember on the Conon Estate where there was obviously water power at one stage because the characteristic fine ashlar building is on the face of the wall. There's the mill dam and the mill lade, but after that went out of use, the age of the tractor came along and to drive the thrashing mill they had a shaft coming through the wall with a pulley on the outside which was belt-driven by the tractor. Now, they decided at some stage that an oil engine, inside the building would be more appropriate, and all the foundations, and all the stains of the spilled oil is inside the building. Now I'm not entirely sure which came first, the tractor or the oil engine. Fairly close together I suspect. Maybe they had a better tractor than an oil engine, I don't know, but then, all these have been abandoned, and there was a big electric motor installed, which has got some of the line shafting still there today and it was belt, a belt driving the thrashing mill and also the bruiser again. Now, in the age of the combine, most of that equipment would've been removed and the building converted into a grain dryer and grain storage because no longer was the crop stored in the farm, of stacks in the stackyard, that were thrashed throughout the winter period. With the coming of the combine harvester, all the grain comes in at once and you've got to dry it and store it so the pressure on the farm buildings changes totally. So, lots of farm buildings were converted with the coming of the combine, either into grain storage in bulk, grain drying, or a mixture of both. So you see buildings with lots of doors and windows have been blanked off with concrete blocks and the building becomes a bulk store, possibly with underfloor ventilation, or a drying floor underneath, a continuous drier or, simply, low volume ventilation to keep the grain in good condition.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
Powered by Capture

Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (27 de 32)

ROS

2010an

claistinneach; àiteachas; tuathanas; tuathanasan; bailtean; àitean-còmhnaidh; taighean;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air muilnean fo chumhachd na smùid agus mar a dh'atharraich cleachdadh nan togalaichean san tuathanas nuair a thàinig na h-innealan mòra ioma-bhuain a-steach.<br /> <br /> Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.<br /> <br /> Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> AC: The other one that I remember is actually visible from where are now at Wellhouse, because just a couple of fields away is Kilcoy Farm, and that Kilcoy Farm had a steam engine but I only remember the brick chimney stack which was demolished, probably early '70s. All that's left of it now is the circular dressed stone that was on the top of it has been retained by one of the Jack family that own the farm, and he's got it in his garden, on the lawn, with roses growing in the middle of it, so it hasn't totally disappeared. I think that's all I can think of on ...<br /> <br /> Eh, no, another, another factor that's quite interesting, that I see in farm buildings is the different ages of power and there's one that I remember on the Conon Estate where there was obviously water power at one stage because the characteristic fine ashlar building is on the face of the wall. There's the mill dam and the mill lade, but after that went out of use, the age of the tractor came along and to drive the thrashing mill they had a shaft coming through the wall with a pulley on the outside which was belt-driven by the tractor. Now, they decided at some stage that an oil engine, inside the building would be more appropriate, and all the foundations, and all the stains of the spilled oil is inside the building. Now I'm not entirely sure which came first, the tractor or the oil engine. Fairly close together I suspect. Maybe they had a better tractor than an oil engine, I don't know, but then, all these have been abandoned, and there was a big electric motor installed, which has got some of the line shafting still there today and it was belt, a belt driving the thrashing mill and also the bruiser again. Now, in the age of the combine, most of that equipment would've been removed and the building converted into a grain dryer and grain storage because no longer was the crop stored in the farm, of stacks in the stackyard, that were thrashed throughout the winter period. With the coming of the combine harvester, all the grain comes in at once and you've got to dry it and store it so the pressure on the farm buildings changes totally. So, lots of farm buildings were converted with the coming of the combine, either into grain storage in bulk, grain drying, or a mixture of both. So you see buildings with lots of doors and windows have been blanked off with concrete blocks and the building becomes a bulk store, possibly with underfloor ventilation, or a drying floor underneath, a continuous drier or, simply, low volume ventilation to keep the grain in good condition.