Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 21/03/2017
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TIOTAL
Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (29 de 32)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_ALASDAIR_CAMERON_03_05
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS
DEIT
2010
LINN
2010an
CRUTHADAIR
Alasdair Cameron
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
41094
KEYWORDS
claistinneach
àiteachas
tuathanas
tuathanasan
bailtean
àitean-còmhnaidh
taighean

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San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air ionadan muilne ann an Cromba, Bail' an Naoimh Màrtainn agus an Àrdach/ Poyntzfield.

Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.

Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)

AC: I'm not entirely sure that, of what was what in Cromarty, but it doesn't fit into the normal pattern but there were certainly mills in the vicinity. Best known, and within living memory, is Shore Mill which happens to be by the shore and was conveniently placed, if it had happened, because the Cromarty to Conon railway would've passed by the doorstep and there's actually bits of the track-bed visible on either side of Shore Mill today. The next one there is Gordons Mills which had a chequered history of various products that it attempted to handle. The full history is well recorded in Jim McKay's recent book on the history of the Resolis Parish.

We're looking at St Martins. St Martins Mill served that community although there's not what we would consider a, a village development there but I think there would've been a much more concentrated settlement there in the past. And we're looking at Culbokie which was quite a hub of activity, still is but for different reasons, but it was nominated as a market town, and the travelling fairs liked to come there and it's got lots of water power and everything you needed for a settlement. Alcaig is another village that had everything going for it, but some of the pubs were deemed to be not quite legal in modern thinking, but nevertheless that a drink was available if you knew who to ask, and it also was on the line of communications from Kessock Ferry to Alcaig Ferry so that confirmed its establishment as a village. And then the next one is really on to the Conon Estate which probably had quite a significant settlement at one stage and had all the features you would wish for a settlement there.

Right, I've overshot slightly. Quite an important mill site known as Poyntzfield Mills which uses the same water twice. There's two mills, one above the other in close proximity. There were two waterwheels and the same water generated power twice there. There was a bit of a problem with the access roads when the mills were in operation because the mill lade travelled above the road at a fairly low level, so only a horse and cart could get underneath it so, as soon as the mill ceased to be used, to be in use, the mill lade was rapidly demolished. Speculation on one of the mills; it's got a stone cross on the top. One local theory is that it was also used as the local church at one time but, that's just one of the theories. Again, different roads have different importances and that, if you look at the different roads that come into Poyntzfield House, sometimes it looks like it's back to front but it may be that there was a more important road came from the other side, and changes of priorities and importance on the different routes over the ages.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (29 de 32)

ROS

2010an

claistinneach; àiteachas; tuathanas; tuathanasan; bailtean; àitean-còmhnaidh; taighean;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air ionadan muilne ann an Cromba, Bail' an Naoimh Màrtainn agus an Àrdach/ Poyntzfield.<br /> <br /> Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.<br /> <br /> Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> AC: I'm not entirely sure that, of what was what in Cromarty, but it doesn't fit into the normal pattern but there were certainly mills in the vicinity. Best known, and within living memory, is Shore Mill which happens to be by the shore and was conveniently placed, if it had happened, because the Cromarty to Conon railway would've passed by the doorstep and there's actually bits of the track-bed visible on either side of Shore Mill today. The next one there is Gordons Mills which had a chequered history of various products that it attempted to handle. The full history is well recorded in Jim McKay's recent book on the history of the Resolis Parish.<br /> <br /> We're looking at St Martins. St Martins Mill served that community although there's not what we would consider a, a village development there but I think there would've been a much more concentrated settlement there in the past. And we're looking at Culbokie which was quite a hub of activity, still is but for different reasons, but it was nominated as a market town, and the travelling fairs liked to come there and it's got lots of water power and everything you needed for a settlement. Alcaig is another village that had everything going for it, but some of the pubs were deemed to be not quite legal in modern thinking, but nevertheless that a drink was available if you knew who to ask, and it also was on the line of communications from Kessock Ferry to Alcaig Ferry so that confirmed its establishment as a village. And then the next one is really on to the Conon Estate which probably had quite a significant settlement at one stage and had all the features you would wish for a settlement there.<br /> <br /> Right, I've overshot slightly. Quite an important mill site known as Poyntzfield Mills which uses the same water twice. There's two mills, one above the other in close proximity. There were two waterwheels and the same water generated power twice there. There was a bit of a problem with the access roads when the mills were in operation because the mill lade travelled above the road at a fairly low level, so only a horse and cart could get underneath it so, as soon as the mill ceased to be used, to be in use, the mill lade was rapidly demolished. Speculation on one of the mills; it's got a stone cross on the top. One local theory is that it was also used as the local church at one time but, that's just one of the theories. Again, different roads have different importances and that, if you look at the different roads that come into Poyntzfield House, sometimes it looks like it's back to front but it may be that there was a more important road came from the other side, and changes of priorities and importance on the different routes over the ages.