Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 21/03/2017
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TIOTAL
Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (30 de 32)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_ALASDAIR_CAMERON_04_01
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS
DEIT
2010
LINN
2010an
CRUTHADAIR
Alasdair Cameron
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
41095
KEYWORDS
claistinneach
àiteachas
tuathanas
tuathanasan
bailtean
àitean-còmhnaidh
taighean

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San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air cho cudromach 's a bha am Blàr Dubh mar ionad armailteach an Dàrna Cogaidh, gu h-àraid a thaobh an 'Indian Mountain Artillery'.

Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.

Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)

AC: I've been interested in World War Two operations because I used to go into the station at Muir of Ord and there was all these brick buildings that were obviously military but in my day were purely distribution for animal feed, for all the different manufacturing companies like Silcock's, Bibby's etcetera. But, oh, it was much later I found out that it was the hub of activity for baking bread for all the military establishments in the north and also the butchery and food stores. So, it was really the hub of operations. It's gone totally now, replaced by a housing estate. Muir of Ord was a important military base. The surrounding big houses were commandeered for a variety of purposes but also there was Indian Mountain Artillery had a base there, on what is now the Black Isle Showground, the car park section of the Black Isle Showground. And what remains there is the concrete bases of, where the mules were suitably looked after because the men had to live in tents but the mules got a hard concrete standing, and they had a tubular structure, basically scaffolding poles stuck in the concrete and a single pitched roof of asbestos cement, corrugated sheeting on top of that. And, I've learnt that from a investigation that's ongoing at Ballater where they had more surviving material than is in this area.

Now I've also come across quite a lot of reminiscences of Indian Regiments in the Black Isle and I keep on finding more references to camps. Now, there was one at, near Redcastle Station, but also in the Linnie Woods, and also half way up the drive to the farm we know as Tore Mains today. They were down at the Kessock area, but how long they were in these different locations I'm not quite sure. Certainly, the one at Tore Mains, they were there for a reasonable period of time because the local children looked forward to going to visit them at the weekend, where they would get sweets and biscuits and occasionally chocolate which was a unheard of treat. The ones in Muir of Ord even had such unknown things to the children - oranges, which didn't exist for the civilian population.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (30 de 32)

ROS

2010an

claistinneach; àiteachas; tuathanas; tuathanasan; bailtean; àitean-còmhnaidh; taighean;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air cho cudromach 's a bha am Blàr Dubh mar ionad armailteach an Dàrna Cogaidh, gu h-àraid a thaobh an 'Indian Mountain Artillery'.<br /> <br /> Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.<br /> <br /> Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> AC: I've been interested in World War Two operations because I used to go into the station at Muir of Ord and there was all these brick buildings that were obviously military but in my day were purely distribution for animal feed, for all the different manufacturing companies like Silcock's, Bibby's etcetera. But, oh, it was much later I found out that it was the hub of activity for baking bread for all the military establishments in the north and also the butchery and food stores. So, it was really the hub of operations. It's gone totally now, replaced by a housing estate. Muir of Ord was a important military base. The surrounding big houses were commandeered for a variety of purposes but also there was Indian Mountain Artillery had a base there, on what is now the Black Isle Showground, the car park section of the Black Isle Showground. And what remains there is the concrete bases of, where the mules were suitably looked after because the men had to live in tents but the mules got a hard concrete standing, and they had a tubular structure, basically scaffolding poles stuck in the concrete and a single pitched roof of asbestos cement, corrugated sheeting on top of that. And, I've learnt that from a investigation that's ongoing at Ballater where they had more surviving material than is in this area.<br /> <br /> Now I've also come across quite a lot of reminiscences of Indian Regiments in the Black Isle and I keep on finding more references to camps. Now, there was one at, near Redcastle Station, but also in the Linnie Woods, and also half way up the drive to the farm we know as Tore Mains today. They were down at the Kessock area, but how long they were in these different locations I'm not quite sure. Certainly, the one at Tore Mains, they were there for a reasonable period of time because the local children looked forward to going to visit them at the weekend, where they would get sweets and biscuits and occasionally chocolate which was a unheard of treat. The ones in Muir of Ord even had such unknown things to the children - oranges, which didn't exist for the civilian population.