Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 21/03/2017
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TIOTAL
Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (32 de 32)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_ALASDAIR_CAMERON_04_03
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS
DEIT
2010
LINN
2010an
CRUTHADAIR
Alasdair Cameron
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
41097
KEYWORDS
claistinneach
àiteachas
tuathanas
tuathanasan
bailtean
àitean-còmhnaidh
taighean

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San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air campaichean Canàdianach an fhiodh a bha san Eilean Dubh aig àm an Dàrna Cogaidh.

Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.

Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)

AC: I've always been interested in hearing tales about the Canadian presence in wartime and Canadian lumber camps, and that I've been asking some questions about these and I've got more answers from the Canadian side than I was able to find here to begin with. But in the Black Isle I've established that, again, Muir of Ord was very important and was deemed to be a frontier town as far as timber operations was concerned, because it was deemed to be pretty wild on a Saturday night when the lumberjacks came from Strathconon, Fairburn and Urray, and some would've come from the Black Isle area as well. And, there was, it was, really a Wild West town by some of the comments I've heard about it. As well as the people coming in, a lot of the timber came in to be loaded onto the railway at Muir of Ord. In the Black Isle itself there was a significant Canadian Camp known as Bog of Shannon, Rosehaugh, or simply Black Isle Camp, and that it had workshops, and quite a good supply of all the different materials for repair and maintenance of sawmilling and harvesting equipment. There was also two Newfoundland timber camps that I haven't established the exact location of them yet, but they were referred to as Rosemarkie One and Rosemarkie Two. Now, one of these was presumably in the Learnie area and I've got a few contacts that might be able to tell me a little bit more about these, but it's easier to find information on the Canadian activities than the Newfoundland because the Newfoundland teams were basically civilians whereas the Canadian were a military organisation which meant everything was recorded in triplicate. One of the tales from a descendant was that her father had fallen off a roof of a sawmill building, broke his ankle but, although he was relatively near the hospital in Inverness he had to return to base camp at Kiltarlity to get permission from the superintendent to be ill and go to hospital so, don't think he appreciated that journey

CM: So, this is the Black Isle Camp ...

AC: The Black Isle Camp ...

CM: ... at Rosehaugh?

AC: ... that went under various names, was actually situated on Burn Farm at Killen, so called because it's on the burn ...

CM: OK.

AC: ... and that is actually one of the locations I missed out when I was talking about water turbines. There was a water turbine on the neighbouring farm there. That location was one of the planned villages of Mr Fletcher of Rosehaugh, and that there's a row of houses there - very distinctive style of architecture - but that's as far as it got, when he passed away himself.

CM: What's distinctive about the, the architecture?

AC: Oh ...

CM: Oh ...

AC: ... it's different.

CM: Uh-huh.

AC: It's different.

CM: You just know that it's, it's ...

AC: Different.

CM: ... specific to there, rather than, yeh. OK.

AC: I think it's all been sold off now but ...

CM: Uh-huh.

AC: ... it's worth having a look at, actually. But the actual, the military camp, there's, there's maybe a little bit of concrete left, nothing else ...

CM: Mmmm.

AC: ... but it would be just a big tin hut. But I do have, I do have ledgers. My late brother-in-law's family in Dingwall, I rescued ledgers when the office was being abandoned, and that his father did a lot of work for military camps from Golspie down to Carrbridge, timber corps, so there's names of Major this ordered such-and-such, and what they did, and what they made, so that they were recording all that. And when Melynda [Jarrat] was looking over stuff, on one of the pages, got very excited because one of the names ordering stuff, [she] said, 'Oh, I know this chap's grandson; he works in the Museum of Civilisation in Ottawa' so we had to send that to him.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Alasdair Cameron (32 de 32)

ROS

2010an

claistinneach; àiteachas; tuathanas; tuathanasan; bailtean; àitean-còmhnaidh; taighean;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

San earrainn fuaim seo tha Alasdair Camshron, tuathanach san Eilean Dubh, a' bruidhinn air campaichean Canàdianach an fhiodh a bha san Eilean Dubh aig àm an Dàrna Cogaidh.<br /> <br /> Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.<br /> <br /> Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh: (Agallaiche: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> AC: I've always been interested in hearing tales about the Canadian presence in wartime and Canadian lumber camps, and that I've been asking some questions about these and I've got more answers from the Canadian side than I was able to find here to begin with. But in the Black Isle I've established that, again, Muir of Ord was very important and was deemed to be a frontier town as far as timber operations was concerned, because it was deemed to be pretty wild on a Saturday night when the lumberjacks came from Strathconon, Fairburn and Urray, and some would've come from the Black Isle area as well. And, there was, it was, really a Wild West town by some of the comments I've heard about it. As well as the people coming in, a lot of the timber came in to be loaded onto the railway at Muir of Ord. In the Black Isle itself there was a significant Canadian Camp known as Bog of Shannon, Rosehaugh, or simply Black Isle Camp, and that it had workshops, and quite a good supply of all the different materials for repair and maintenance of sawmilling and harvesting equipment. There was also two Newfoundland timber camps that I haven't established the exact location of them yet, but they were referred to as Rosemarkie One and Rosemarkie Two. Now, one of these was presumably in the Learnie area and I've got a few contacts that might be able to tell me a little bit more about these, but it's easier to find information on the Canadian activities than the Newfoundland because the Newfoundland teams were basically civilians whereas the Canadian were a military organisation which meant everything was recorded in triplicate. One of the tales from a descendant was that her father had fallen off a roof of a sawmill building, broke his ankle but, although he was relatively near the hospital in Inverness he had to return to base camp at Kiltarlity to get permission from the superintendent to be ill and go to hospital so, don't think he appreciated that journey<br /> <br /> CM: So, this is the Black Isle Camp ...<br /> <br /> AC: The Black Isle Camp ...<br /> <br /> CM: ... at Rosehaugh?<br /> <br /> AC: ... that went under various names, was actually situated on Burn Farm at Killen, so called because it's on the burn ...<br /> <br /> CM: OK.<br /> <br /> AC: ... and that is actually one of the locations I missed out when I was talking about water turbines. There was a water turbine on the neighbouring farm there. That location was one of the planned villages of Mr Fletcher of Rosehaugh, and that there's a row of houses there - very distinctive style of architecture - but that's as far as it got, when he passed away himself.<br /> <br /> CM: What's distinctive about the, the architecture?<br /> <br /> AC: Oh ...<br /> <br /> CM: Oh ...<br /> <br /> AC: ... it's different.<br /> <br /> CM: Uh-huh.<br /> <br /> AC: It's different.<br /> <br /> CM: You just know that it's, it's ...<br /> <br /> AC: Different.<br /> <br /> CM: ... specific to there, rather than, yeh. OK.<br /> <br /> AC: I think it's all been sold off now but ...<br /> <br /> CM: Uh-huh.<br /> <br /> AC: ... it's worth having a look at, actually. But the actual, the military camp, there's, there's maybe a little bit of concrete left, nothing else ...<br /> <br /> CM: Mmmm.<br /> <br /> AC: ... but it would be just a big tin hut. But I do have, I do have ledgers. My late brother-in-law's family in Dingwall, I rescued ledgers when the office was being abandoned, and that his father did a lot of work for military camps from Golspie down to Carrbridge, timber corps, so there's names of Major this ordered such-and-such, and what they did, and what they made, so that they were recording all that. And when Melynda [Jarrat] was looking over stuff, on one of the pages, got very excited because one of the names ordering stuff, [she] said, 'Oh, I know this chap's grandson; he works in the Museum of Civilisation in Ottawa' so we had to send that to him.