Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 14/07/2017
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TIOTAL
Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Hermione Protheroe (2 de 11)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_HERMI_PROTHEROE_01_02
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS
DEIT
2010
LINN
2010an
CRUTHADAIR
Hermi Protheroe
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
41099
KEYWORDS
claistinneach
tuathanas
tuathanasan
bailtean

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San earrainn fuaim seo tha cuimhn' aig Hermione Protheroe, às Abhach, air na sgoiltean, na bùithean is na h-eaglaisean sa choimhearsnachd.

Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.

Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh:

HP: Can't remember in the morning being up it, but at night we had to go up and help my father and we had this stuff called the Dusmo - I don't know whether you call - and it was, we had to shake that over the floors to keep the dust down. And he had to go up at different times; I remember up at nine o'clock to stoke up the boiler because I think probably children coming in from the country who would be wet would go down there to get dry. I can't remember if there were - there must've been radiators, I suppose.

CM: Because Avoch had a few schools didn't it?

HP: Yes, yes.

CM: When you were growing up which was In the 1930s, and 40s?

HP: Yes, yes, of course I was born in the eighth of November '32.

CM: Oh yes. Uh-huh.

HP: So where that other school was down by the mill house, er, the headmaster was there, a Mr Strachan. He was the one that I knew that stayed there, but we were always in the Public School.

CM: And the Public School, does it have other names as well? Is this the one that now, if you go up to MacKenzie ...?

HP: No, the Public School is no longer there. There's a sort of Spanish-style house was built there on the right hand side, and where the little school was, there's another bungalow built there. So there's no, but actually, at the top where the, the teachers' staffroom was, and where the domestic science, that again was made into sort of cottages, so these, probably the stone is still there, just behind the cemetery. And we used to make our playtime, we would make little houses of the leaves, make all the different rooms. And then we would go up and if there was a burial at the old churchyard, we thought, that it was great to go up and see what was happening [laughs].

CM: And tell me, now, you started to talk about your father's shop, because I think that's one of the things that's really changed now in Avoch, you know, in the time when you are talking about, in the '30s and '40s, there were many shops in the village? There was your father, the shoemaker?

HP: Well, there was another, and there was, eh. Oh what was his name? He'd the shop down in Margaret Street, eh, was he Black? But, however, there was that other shop. And then across from ours there was a shop they called Dave the Butchers. That was the, eh, the butcher, I can't remember. Yes, I thought, the butcher's was the first entrance and then you went through the back and there were groceries there. Along, then at the right side of us where Mike Noble lives now and his wife.

CM: Is that Elim, or the house next to it?

HP: No, Elim was the next one. Em, in those days that was a B & B, this Bob Reid and his wife had that, and then further along was Elim, because I was friendly with Jennifer when she was wee, and her father's shop was there, and then the church. We didn't go, because there was a Free Church up there. I don't know if my father ever went there but they opened this church in Fortrose and my father used to take my older brothers and sisters over to the church, I think they could walk along the main road because there weren't many cars, and they would go home by the railway.

CM: And the church in Fortrose? Is that the ...? Which of the ...?

HP: It's a Free Church in Church Street; it's the little place beside the Town Hall.

CM: And when was that? Was that when you were a child, that it was open? Or?

HP: No, it was opened before, about a hundred years old.

CM: Oh, OK.

HP: And er, I heard the stories from other ones that my brothers used to go in and, instead of putting something in the collection, they would take something out. Because they would get the machine at the station, they would put a penny in it and get a chocolate [laughs].

CM: Of course, the railway, at that time would have been operating?

HP: Yes, we were using the railway because in Avoch everything was happening in Fortrose so when we went to go to the Brownies or the Guides in Fortrose we would pay tuppence on the bus going, and tuppence ha'penny on the train going back.

CM: So there was, em, we've been talking with Jennifer who you mentioned, whose father was the minister at the Congregational ...

HP: Her grandfather.

CM: Her grandfather. And her father had a shop.

HP: Yes.

CM: What was their shop?

HP: It was a grocer's.

CM: OK.

HP: And after that I think a chap took it on as an electricians and of course there was MacDonald the bakers that was across from the church down in, em, Margaret, no, is that, Margaret Street, yes. So, eh, I remember queuing up there for vanilla slices! Everybody thought that was a great treat, and of course the baker used to come through from the baker's which was in George Street, through the 'closie' as we said, carrying the, these slices on his head and everybody, I can't remember how much they were.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Hermione Protheroe (2 de 11)

ROS

2010an

claistinneach; tuathanas; tuathanasan; bailtean;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

San earrainn fuaim seo tha cuimhn' aig Hermione Protheroe, às Abhach, air na sgoiltean, na bùithean is na h-eaglaisean sa choimhearsnachd.<br /> <br /> Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.<br /> <br /> Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh:<br /> <br /> HP: Can't remember in the morning being up it, but at night we had to go up and help my father and we had this stuff called the Dusmo - I don't know whether you call - and it was, we had to shake that over the floors to keep the dust down. And he had to go up at different times; I remember up at nine o'clock to stoke up the boiler because I think probably children coming in from the country who would be wet would go down there to get dry. I can't remember if there were - there must've been radiators, I suppose.<br /> <br /> CM: Because Avoch had a few schools didn't it?<br /> <br /> HP: Yes, yes.<br /> <br /> CM: When you were growing up which was In the 1930s, and 40s?<br /> <br /> HP: Yes, yes, of course I was born in the eighth of November '32.<br /> <br /> CM: Oh yes. Uh-huh.<br /> <br /> HP: So where that other school was down by the mill house, er, the headmaster was there, a Mr Strachan. He was the one that I knew that stayed there, but we were always in the Public School.<br /> <br /> CM: And the Public School, does it have other names as well? Is this the one that now, if you go up to MacKenzie ...?<br /> <br /> HP: No, the Public School is no longer there. There's a sort of Spanish-style house was built there on the right hand side, and where the little school was, there's another bungalow built there. So there's no, but actually, at the top where the, the teachers' staffroom was, and where the domestic science, that again was made into sort of cottages, so these, probably the stone is still there, just behind the cemetery. And we used to make our playtime, we would make little houses of the leaves, make all the different rooms. And then we would go up and if there was a burial at the old churchyard, we thought, that it was great to go up and see what was happening [laughs].<br /> <br /> CM: And tell me, now, you started to talk about your father's shop, because I think that's one of the things that's really changed now in Avoch, you know, in the time when you are talking about, in the '30s and '40s, there were many shops in the village? There was your father, the shoemaker?<br /> <br /> HP: Well, there was another, and there was, eh. Oh what was his name? He'd the shop down in Margaret Street, eh, was he Black? But, however, there was that other shop. And then across from ours there was a shop they called Dave the Butchers. That was the, eh, the butcher, I can't remember. Yes, I thought, the butcher's was the first entrance and then you went through the back and there were groceries there. Along, then at the right side of us where Mike Noble lives now and his wife.<br /> <br /> CM: Is that Elim, or the house next to it?<br /> <br /> HP: No, Elim was the next one. Em, in those days that was a B & B, this Bob Reid and his wife had that, and then further along was Elim, because I was friendly with Jennifer when she was wee, and her father's shop was there, and then the church. We didn't go, because there was a Free Church up there. I don't know if my father ever went there but they opened this church in Fortrose and my father used to take my older brothers and sisters over to the church, I think they could walk along the main road because there weren't many cars, and they would go home by the railway.<br /> <br /> CM: And the church in Fortrose? Is that the ...? Which of the ...?<br /> <br /> HP: It's a Free Church in Church Street; it's the little place beside the Town Hall.<br /> <br /> CM: And when was that? Was that when you were a child, that it was open? Or?<br /> <br /> HP: No, it was opened before, about a hundred years old.<br /> <br /> CM: Oh, OK. <br /> <br /> HP: And er, I heard the stories from other ones that my brothers used to go in and, instead of putting something in the collection, they would take something out. Because they would get the machine at the station, they would put a penny in it and get a chocolate [laughs].<br /> <br /> CM: Of course, the railway, at that time would have been operating?<br /> <br /> HP: Yes, we were using the railway because in Avoch everything was happening in Fortrose so when we went to go to the Brownies or the Guides in Fortrose we would pay tuppence on the bus going, and tuppence ha'penny on the train going back.<br /> <br /> CM: So there was, em, we've been talking with Jennifer who you mentioned, whose father was the minister at the Congregational ...<br /> <br /> HP: Her grandfather.<br /> <br /> CM: Her grandfather. And her father had a shop.<br /> <br /> HP: Yes.<br /> <br /> CM: What was their shop?<br /> <br /> HP: It was a grocer's. <br /> <br /> CM: OK.<br /> <br /> HP: And after that I think a chap took it on as an electricians and of course there was MacDonald the bakers that was across from the church down in, em, Margaret, no, is that, Margaret Street, yes. So, eh, I remember queuing up there for vanilla slices! Everybody thought that was a great treat, and of course the baker used to come through from the baker's which was in George Street, through the 'closie' as we said, carrying the, these slices on his head and everybody, I can't remember how much they were.