Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 19/01/2017
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TIOTAL
Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Hermione Protheroe (3 de 11)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_HERMI_PROTHEROE_02_01
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS
DEIT
2010
LINN
2010an
CRUTHADAIR
Hermi Protheroe
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
41100
KEYWORDS
claistinneach
tuathanas
tuathanasan
bailtean

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San earrainn fuaim seo tha Hermione Protheroe, às Abhach, a' bruidhinn air cuid de na rudan a b' fheàrr leatha a dhèanamh na h-òige, nam measg geamannan is cuairtean coiseachd sa choimhearsnachd.

Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.

Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh:

HP: Just across from our house, across the main road there was an opening, we called it the Opening, this was the top of James Street and there all the children collected because of course there was no MacKenzie Terrace, none of these places, it was all the village, and we played skips, and we did marbles, and actually there was a fish shop but there was a sort of, em, little hump of grass where we sat and played, neighbours played, the little girls played with their dolls and then there was a wall along by Dave the Butchers where we sat on a Sunday playing 'five stanes'; that's where you throw one stone up and picked up the, see how many other ones. And then 'numbers,' that was numbers of cars and believe it or not we were all gasping for a car to come along the street. You see, if you had a five or nothing [?] you had one point and- That was great, just looking for a car or waving to someone in a car.

CM: And this was before the A9 of course?

HP: Oh yes, yes.

CM: So nobody was travelling; there wasn't quite the volume of traffic ...

HP: Oh no, no, no.

CM: ... that there is now.

HP: And then we played games of bows, eh, arrows and we went through all the little closies. There was a closie in Margaret Street and round, up and down the streets, and, of course, the backs of the streets then had drains where people threw out their slops.

CM: Just open, open drains?

HP: Open. And we used to jump over these, but of course now that's all taken up with people who have bought the cottages and have built, extended and that. And we used to go down the shore and play 'shoppies' where your sand was sugar and you mixed it with water to make butter and your shelf. We were all very, er, what's the word I'm looking for? And we played this Duck Stane which was a big stone we would find and put a stone and then aiming things to try and knock it off. And we gathered whelks and put them in a tin and boiled them and ate the whelks. And I would hate it now. I don't know how we got them out but, and then going up actually up outside of Avoch along the Low Road and trying to get raspberries and sometimes not being able to get enough of them we'd just squash them and put them in our faces, and oh [laughs] the mad things we did.

CM: You mentioned the Low Road Hermy?

HP: The Low Road.

CM: Now, where was the Low Road to? Was it to the ...?

HP: The Low Road is at the bottom of the road going up to the Burnt House. We always called that the High Road, and the Low Road. And the Low Road was along where Joan was born. There was the First Lodge, we said, and there was the Second Lodge and that's where Joan was born, and then you could go to Rosehaugh along that way or you could go up the High Road which was up by the Burnt House.

CM: Now, you've mentioned the Burnt House, that's Avoch House as other people would know it. Em, I've got a picture of it here.

HP: I just wonder, was there another Avoch House? That was definitely the Burnt House and the person living there when we were young was Alec the Post and he and Joan's father were well known as knitters. You'd never heard of Calvin Klein then but they were the [laughs] Calvin Klein! Yes, they could both knit.

CM: And would that, was this gansey knitting as, or just any?

HP: Ach, I just don't know what they knit. Joan would be able to tell you.

CM: Mm. So this, it's called Avoch House, eh, in some of the pictures.

HP: Oh it is, uh-huh. I thought there was another place called Avoch House

CM: When you were a child.

HP: Oh that was occupied.

CM: Uh-huh. But it had already been ...?

HP: ... been burnt, yes. Uh-huh. It was always referred to as the Burnt House. And then of course you could walk right up there, up to Rosehaugh, which was a beautiful walk and on a Sunday you would see lots of people out walking. They always liked to walk round Rosehaugh because it was very peaceful there and - not that it was very noisy in the street [laughs] but, eh.

CM: You told me that as a child you went to Muirale?

HP: Oh yes, we went to Muiralehouse to see the cows [?] in there and of course we went picking tatties, gathering tatties in October. Oh, eh, school holidays, we would all get a farmer and go in the, no word of helmets then, we were all piled at the back of the tractor and when you look back on it you think, gosh, there were no accidents.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Hermione Protheroe (3 de 11)

ROS

2010an

claistinneach; tuathanas; tuathanasan; bailtean;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

San earrainn fuaim seo tha Hermione Protheroe, às Abhach, a' bruidhinn air cuid de na rudan a b' fheàrr leatha a dhèanamh na h-òige, nam measg geamannan is cuairtean coiseachd sa choimhearsnachd.<br /> <br /> Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.<br /> <br /> Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh:<br /> <br /> HP: Just across from our house, across the main road there was an opening, we called it the Opening, this was the top of James Street and there all the children collected because of course there was no MacKenzie Terrace, none of these places, it was all the village, and we played skips, and we did marbles, and actually there was a fish shop but there was a sort of, em, little hump of grass where we sat and played, neighbours played, the little girls played with their dolls and then there was a wall along by Dave the Butchers where we sat on a Sunday playing 'five stanes'; that's where you throw one stone up and picked up the, see how many other ones. And then 'numbers,' that was numbers of cars and believe it or not we were all gasping for a car to come along the street. You see, if you had a five or nothing [?] you had one point and- That was great, just looking for a car or waving to someone in a car.<br /> <br /> CM: And this was before the A9 of course?<br /> <br /> HP: Oh yes, yes.<br /> <br /> CM: So nobody was travelling; there wasn't quite the volume of traffic ...<br /> <br /> HP: Oh no, no, no.<br /> <br /> CM: ... that there is now.<br /> <br /> HP: And then we played games of bows, eh, arrows and we went through all the little closies. There was a closie in Margaret Street and round, up and down the streets, and, of course, the backs of the streets then had drains where people threw out their slops. <br /> <br /> CM: Just open, open drains?<br /> <br /> HP: Open. And we used to jump over these, but of course now that's all taken up with people who have bought the cottages and have built, extended and that. And we used to go down the shore and play 'shoppies' where your sand was sugar and you mixed it with water to make butter and your shelf. We were all very, er, what's the word I'm looking for? And we played this Duck Stane which was a big stone we would find and put a stone and then aiming things to try and knock it off. And we gathered whelks and put them in a tin and boiled them and ate the whelks. And I would hate it now. I don't know how we got them out but, and then going up actually up outside of Avoch along the Low Road and trying to get raspberries and sometimes not being able to get enough of them we'd just squash them and put them in our faces, and oh [laughs] the mad things we did.<br /> <br /> CM: You mentioned the Low Road Hermy?<br /> <br /> HP: The Low Road.<br /> <br /> CM: Now, where was the Low Road to? Was it to the ...?<br /> <br /> HP: The Low Road is at the bottom of the road going up to the Burnt House. We always called that the High Road, and the Low Road. And the Low Road was along where Joan was born. There was the First Lodge, we said, and there was the Second Lodge and that's where Joan was born, and then you could go to Rosehaugh along that way or you could go up the High Road which was up by the Burnt House.<br /> <br /> CM: Now, you've mentioned the Burnt House, that's Avoch House as other people would know it. Em, I've got a picture of it here.<br /> <br /> HP: I just wonder, was there another Avoch House? That was definitely the Burnt House and the person living there when we were young was Alec the Post and he and Joan's father were well known as knitters. You'd never heard of Calvin Klein then but they were the [laughs] Calvin Klein! Yes, they could both knit.<br /> <br /> CM: And would that, was this gansey knitting as, or just any?<br /> <br /> HP: Ach, I just don't know what they knit. Joan would be able to tell you.<br /> <br /> CM: Mm. So this, it's called Avoch House, eh, in some of the pictures.<br /> <br /> HP: Oh it is, uh-huh. I thought there was another place called Avoch House<br /> <br /> CM: When you were a child.<br /> <br /> HP: Oh that was occupied.<br /> <br /> CM: Uh-huh. But it had already been ...?<br /> <br /> HP: ... been burnt, yes. Uh-huh. It was always referred to as the Burnt House. And then of course you could walk right up there, up to Rosehaugh, which was a beautiful walk and on a Sunday you would see lots of people out walking. They always liked to walk round Rosehaugh because it was very peaceful there and - not that it was very noisy in the street [laughs] but, eh.<br /> <br /> CM: You told me that as a child you went to Muirale?<br /> <br /> HP: Oh yes, we went to Muiralehouse to see the cows [?] in there and of course we went picking tatties, gathering tatties in October. Oh, eh, school holidays, we would all get a farmer and go in the, no word of helmets then, we were all piled at the back of the tractor and when you look back on it you think, gosh, there were no accidents.