Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 18/09/2017
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TIOTAL
Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Hermione Protheroe (4 de 11)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_HERMI_PROTHEROE_02_02
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS
DEIT
2010
LINN
2000an
CRUTHADAIR
Hermi Protheroe
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
41101
KEYWORDS
claistinneach
tuathanas
tuathanasan
bailtean

Get Adobe Flash player

San earrainn fuaim seo tha Hermione Protheroe, às Abhach, a' cuimhneachadh cuid de na rudan a dhèanadh i na h-òige agus na h-àiteachan far an coinnicheadh i fhèin 's a caraidean.

Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.

Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh:

HP: And we would take what was called our 'half yoke' with us [a piece/sandwich for break time, still called that in the 1970s], the break, and, oh it would be freezing and the farmer would measure the stances and we would be spending the rest of the, measuring to see if you had anything bigger or if yours was smaller than mine [laughs].

CM: And when you went to Muirale, do you remember, it was a dairy at that time?

HP: Yes.

CM: Uh-huh.

HP: Yes, it was a beautiful place.

CM: Did you ev- and you went in, you said, to see the cows being milked?

HP: Oh yes we would go in and see that being done.

CM: Do you remember the inside of the dairy? Do you remember what you saw when you went in?

HP: Oh, Just rows and rows of cows and I suppose in those days it would've been hand milked. Uh-huh.

CM: And were they in stalls?

HP: Yes, yes. I just couldn't tell you how many or even who, oh it was a Mr Mackay, a Mr Mackay, because actually his son always came down to my mother and brought some milk every day - Davie. He was a local character who sang cowboy songs at the local concerts. Of course we did concerts too. We used to ah, a lorry from the sawmill would come to the opening.

CM: And which sawmill was that?

HP: The big one's up where the station is now.

CM: OK

HP: One of Wylies [he had the sawmill] and it would come to the opening and, goodness knows how we performed but I always remember us, we would try, somebody would be up on holiday but they would know something different, you know? But it was just the people in the village coming round and listening to that.

CM: Because the Amenities Committee, people have talked a lot about in Avoch, the Amenities Committee getting together to build the Pavilion, and you had lots and lots and lots of sports facilities in the village in the fifties, I suppose this would be. People talking about the bowling green and the tennis courts and - it was very active, the community.

HP: Up by where the station, the old station was.

CM: Is this near the Free Church Manse?

HP: Yes, across from there, that was just a lovely place, another place we went.

CM: Mmm-hmm.

HP: I don't know whether I should be telling you, that's where we were smoking [laughs] as young ones, we used - I think we used to collect bottles after the Farmers' Ball up at the, well it was the Village Hall then, we as kids - we never got pocket money - so we collected bottles and took them. We could get tuppence for a bottle and then we used to put it together and buy Woodbines, I think, out of Jennifer's father's shop. And we used to go up there because it was a lovely pavilion. And another time we were under the bridge, as you go up by the old, well what was the Public School, and we were all there and the miller's wife caught us and we thought it was the end of the world, that she would tell our parents [laughs]. I forget how old we were but that was a beautiful tennis court.

CM: Well, you, your talking about the miller's wife makes me think now about the mills in Avoch because there's the old mill up, em, where the mill lade was, you've talked about going for a walk along the route of the lade?

HP: Oh yes, yes.

CM: But there was another mill, is that right?

HP: This was the mill for the oatmeal where we used to go in and put our hands wherever it came out of, and just eat the lovely warm oatmeal.

CM: And where was the mill in relation to the village?

HP: Eh, let's see now, was it across ...? Eh, you had a postcard of it somewhere.

CM: We'll get that in. So we were talking about the mill, Hermy, the mill for Avoch. And you remember going, you were saying ...

HP: Yes when we were young, I was maybe eight or ten, we used to go in there and it was always lovely and warm and we would cup our hands and get the warm oatmeal coming down from the chute or whatever, and then at the side of the mill, of course, was the wheel which we used to watch. Yes, there was always a lovely walk along there and then at the end of it were wooden steps up to the railway. And the railway, well wasn't far then you could walk at the side of the railway, or there was a path too right along to the station.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
Powered by Capture

Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Hermione Protheroe (4 de 11)

ROS

2000an

claistinneach; tuathanas; tuathanasan; bailtean;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

San earrainn fuaim seo tha Hermione Protheroe, às Abhach, a' cuimhneachadh cuid de na rudan a dhèanadh i na h-òige agus na h-àiteachan far an coinnicheadh i fhèin 's a caraidean.<br /> <br /> Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.<br /> <br /> Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh:<br /> <br /> HP: And we would take what was called our 'half yoke' with us [a piece/sandwich for break time, still called that in the 1970s], the break, and, oh it would be freezing and the farmer would measure the stances and we would be spending the rest of the, measuring to see if you had anything bigger or if yours was smaller than mine [laughs].<br /> <br /> CM: And when you went to Muirale, do you remember, it was a dairy at that time?<br /> <br /> HP: Yes.<br /> <br /> CM: Uh-huh.<br /> <br /> HP: Yes, it was a beautiful place.<br /> <br /> CM: Did you ev- and you went in, you said, to see the cows being milked?<br /> <br /> HP: Oh yes we would go in and see that being done.<br /> <br /> CM: Do you remember the inside of the dairy? Do you remember what you saw when you went in?<br /> <br /> HP: Oh, Just rows and rows of cows and I suppose in those days it would've been hand milked. Uh-huh. <br /> <br /> CM: And were they in stalls?<br /> <br /> HP: Yes, yes. I just couldn't tell you how many or even who, oh it was a Mr Mackay, a Mr Mackay, because actually his son always came down to my mother and brought some milk every day - Davie. He was a local character who sang cowboy songs at the local concerts. Of course we did concerts too. We used to ah, a lorry from the sawmill would come to the opening.<br /> <br /> CM: And which sawmill was that? <br /> <br /> HP: The big one's up where the station is now.<br /> <br /> CM: OK<br /> <br /> HP: One of Wylies [he had the sawmill] and it would come to the opening and, goodness knows how we performed but I always remember us, we would try, somebody would be up on holiday but they would know something different, you know? But it was just the people in the village coming round and listening to that.<br /> <br /> CM: Because the Amenities Committee, people have talked a lot about in Avoch, the Amenities Committee getting together to build the Pavilion, and you had lots and lots and lots of sports facilities in the village in the fifties, I suppose this would be. People talking about the bowling green and the tennis courts and - it was very active, the community. <br /> <br /> HP: Up by where the station, the old station was.<br /> <br /> CM: Is this near the Free Church Manse?<br /> <br /> HP: Yes, across from there, that was just a lovely place, another place we went.<br /> <br /> CM: Mmm-hmm.<br /> <br /> HP: I don't know whether I should be telling you, that's where we were smoking [laughs] as young ones, we used - I think we used to collect bottles after the Farmers' Ball up at the, well it was the Village Hall then, we as kids - we never got pocket money - so we collected bottles and took them. We could get tuppence for a bottle and then we used to put it together and buy Woodbines, I think, out of Jennifer's father's shop. And we used to go up there because it was a lovely pavilion. And another time we were under the bridge, as you go up by the old, well what was the Public School, and we were all there and the miller's wife caught us and we thought it was the end of the world, that she would tell our parents [laughs]. I forget how old we were but that was a beautiful tennis court.<br /> <br /> CM: Well, you, your talking about the miller's wife makes me think now about the mills in Avoch because there's the old mill up, em, where the mill lade was, you've talked about going for a walk along the route of the lade?<br /> <br /> HP: Oh yes, yes.<br /> <br /> CM: But there was another mill, is that right?<br /> <br /> HP: This was the mill for the oatmeal where we used to go in and put our hands wherever it came out of, and just eat the lovely warm oatmeal.<br /> <br /> CM: And where was the mill in relation to the village?<br /> <br /> HP: Eh, let's see now, was it across ...? Eh, you had a postcard of it somewhere.<br /> <br /> CM: We'll get that in. So we were talking about the mill, Hermy, the mill for Avoch. And you remember going, you were saying ...<br /> <br /> HP: Yes when we were young, I was maybe eight or ten, we used to go in there and it was always lovely and warm and we would cup our hands and get the warm oatmeal coming down from the chute or whatever, and then at the side of the mill, of course, was the wheel which we used to watch. Yes, there was always a lovely walk along there and then at the end of it were wooden steps up to the railway. And the railway, well wasn't far then you could walk at the side of the railway, or there was a path too right along to the station.