Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 21/09/2017
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TIOTAL
Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Hermione Protheroe (10 de 11)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_HERMI_PROTHEROE_03_03
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS
DEIT
2010
LINN
2010an
CRUTHADAIR
Hermi Protheroe
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
41106
KEYWORDS
claistinneach
tuathanas
tuathanasan
bailtean

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San earrainn fuaim seo tha Hermione Protheroe, às Abhach, ag aithris rann mu Abhach a chaidh a dhèanamh le caraid dhi.

Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.

Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh:

CM: Now you mention that there's a poem, and I know you have a copy of it. Would you tell us a little bit about the poem and then ...

HP: Well, Peggy Upton, as herself said, their byname [nickname] was Peggy Monsie and I don't remember her when she was young, although I think she was in the same class as my sister Chrissie, and she went down south, I think she married an Englishman, and she came back to Avoch and bought a house in Henrietta Street. And her, then she moved from Henrietta Street because he'd quite a huge garden, he was a great gardener, and she moved to Fortrose, but I think she missed Avoch tremendously, and she was quite a character, so she give me this poem. It's called 'The Village Shops of Yesteryear'.

When I returned to my native Avoch
Oh, the changes I have seen
I thought my eyes had failed me
When I saw the bowling green.

It looked so much like Fortrose.
With a street they call Rose Place
And a supermarket
They call the Mace.

I'm glad they kept the pelly
Where I used to play
For going are the landmarks
That I knew in my day.

Most of all I miss the little shops
That were scattered all around
Where we could buy the week's supply
For under just one pound.

There was over twenty then
Now there's only eight
And it was nice and cheery
When they opened late.

There was dear old Mrs J.J
Who lived right near the pier
She was so very jolly
And your news she'd like to hear.

I went for Dad's tobacco
'Bogie XX' he would say
And I did not know the difference
But four pennies I did pay.

Next there was the Coffee House
Owned by Mr Jack
He didn't sell much coffee
But nothing did he lack.

A suit of clothes he'd make for you
For your wedding day
And Annie who used to work there
Got cracking right away.

Along the road is Dothen's
Who's open to this day
They too sold nearly everything
If you could only pay.

Granny going to and fro
with skirts right to the ground
She was there quite often
For she always had a pound.

Jess had a baker's shop
Helped along by Nell
My favourite was their snowballs
I remember them so well.

Sometimes I got a broken one
To me was such a treat
Oh how I miss the little shops
And all the friends we'd meet.

Dave he had a butcher's shop
And groceries as well
When I went for mother's mince
A quarter he would sell.

When he wrapped it up in paper
It would stick to it like glue
And by the time it reached the pan
There wasn't much to stew.

We did not have a Marks and Sparks
We had an M and B
Maggie Tolly had a shop
Where now the Mace you see.

It was there I bought my first pink blouse
Made of Celanese
And when I washed the blooming thing
It stretched right to my knees.

McDonalds' had a baker's shop
(It's now a child's boutique)
Oh, those gorgeous butteries
There were really quite unique.

Rows and rows of fancy cakes
The best you'd ever seen
When you had one in your hand
They knew where you had been.

Mrs 'Thinkyou' had her shop
Just across the way
She sold bits of this and that
You need from day to day.

When I went in at pockie time
The last night of December
She gave to me a rotten orange
How I well remember!

Mrs Macinante
In George Street they did trade
They had a lot of sweeties
Some of them they made.

When the sun was very hot
They'd melt before your eyes
And when you bought their lucky bags
You'd sure get a surprise.

I went up to our chemist's shop
When I had a cold
To buy an Askit powder
That's what I was told.

Instead I bought some 'Birrels'
Ida said was good
And ate them all before I got home
Then didn't want my food.

Sometimes I went to Dannie
To see what he'd in stock
Not when I was playing
Round about the dock

He was always very patient
And sometimes very kind
However long I took to choose
He didn't really mind.

I think of Bakies Granny
At the bottom of the street
When you went in to get a loaf
perhaps a friend you'd meet.

'Anything new Maggie?'
I can hear them say
'Only my loaves, Jessie'
Oh, well that's the way.'

Poor old Bella Aileen
With her paraffin in a shed
When I went for a bottle full
This is what she said.

'Ma it's a whisky bottle
Does your father take a dram?
I never saw that coat before
You're looking awful gran'

Jack, he had a fish shop
In the middle of the dock
He opened every night
Sharp at five o'clock.

They went to queue outside
And wait, and wait and wait
But we didn't seem to mind
The chips were really great.

There was Johnnie with his batteries
To light us up at night
He was a very godly man
He tried to keep me right.

'Have you been to Sunday School?'
I can hear him say
'No, I haven't Johnnie
I've been out to play'

Now we all have a favourite shop
And mine was by the sea
It was owned by Maggie Gowie
In my memory I still see.

All those good old fashioned sweeties
In every shape and size
Highland Cream and Row-chow
And great big bulls eyes.

We don't forget the dear old folks
Who served us Oh so well
We won't forget the little shops
Who in each one did well.

We won't forget their loyalty
Their kindness and their cheer
They were the ones who made our Avoch
The Avoch we hold so dear.'


By Penny Upton, nee, Patience. Monsie, she's called. [laughs]

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Cuimhneachain air Dualchas an Eilein Dhuibh - Hermione Protheroe (10 de 11)

ROS

2010an

claistinneach; tuathanas; tuathanasan; bailtean;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

San earrainn fuaim seo tha Hermione Protheroe, às Abhach, ag aithris rann mu Abhach a chaidh a dhèanamh le caraid dhi.<br /> <br /> Chaidh na clàraidhean fuaim a dhèanamh nam pàirt de Phròiseact Chuimhneachaidhean Dualchais an Eilein Duibh, air a dhèanamh ann an 2009/2010 le ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands/Arc-eòlas airson Coimhearsnachdan air a' Ghàidhealtachd). Gus an ionnsaich thu tuilleadh mun phròiseact, lean an ceangal aig bonn na duilleig.<br /> <br /> Seo an tar-sgrìobhadh:<br /> <br /> CM: Now you mention that there's a poem, and I know you have a copy of it. Would you tell us a little bit about the poem and then ...<br /> <br /> HP: Well, Peggy Upton, as herself said, their byname [nickname] was Peggy Monsie and I don't remember her when she was young, although I think she was in the same class as my sister Chrissie, and she went down south, I think she married an Englishman, and she came back to Avoch and bought a house in Henrietta Street. And her, then she moved from Henrietta Street because he'd quite a huge garden, he was a great gardener, and she moved to Fortrose, but I think she missed Avoch tremendously, and she was quite a character, so she give me this poem. It's called 'The Village Shops of Yesteryear'.<br /> <br /> When I returned to my native Avoch<br /> Oh, the changes I have seen<br /> I thought my eyes had failed me<br /> When I saw the bowling green.<br /> <br /> It looked so much like Fortrose.<br /> With a street they call Rose Place<br /> And a supermarket<br /> They call the Mace.<br /> <br /> I'm glad they kept the pelly<br /> Where I used to play<br /> For going are the landmarks<br /> That I knew in my day.<br /> <br /> Most of all I miss the little shops<br /> That were scattered all around<br /> Where we could buy the week's supply<br /> For under just one pound.<br /> <br /> There was over twenty then<br /> Now there's only eight<br /> And it was nice and cheery<br /> When they opened late.<br /> <br /> There was dear old Mrs J.J<br /> Who lived right near the pier<br /> She was so very jolly<br /> And your news she'd like to hear.<br /> <br /> I went for Dad's tobacco<br /> 'Bogie XX' he would say<br /> And I did not know the difference<br /> But four pennies I did pay.<br /> <br /> Next there was the Coffee House<br /> Owned by Mr Jack<br /> He didn't sell much coffee<br /> But nothing did he lack.<br /> <br /> A suit of clothes he'd make for you<br /> For your wedding day<br /> And Annie who used to work there<br /> Got cracking right away.<br /> <br /> Along the road is Dothen's<br /> Who's open to this day<br /> They too sold nearly everything<br /> If you could only pay.<br /> <br /> Granny going to and fro<br /> with skirts right to the ground<br /> She was there quite often<br /> For she always had a pound.<br /> <br /> Jess had a baker's shop<br /> Helped along by Nell<br /> My favourite was their snowballs<br /> I remember them so well.<br /> <br /> Sometimes I got a broken one<br /> To me was such a treat<br /> Oh how I miss the little shops<br /> And all the friends we'd meet.<br /> <br /> Dave he had a butcher's shop<br /> And groceries as well<br /> When I went for mother's mince<br /> A quarter he would sell.<br /> <br /> When he wrapped it up in paper<br /> It would stick to it like glue<br /> And by the time it reached the pan<br /> There wasn't much to stew.<br /> <br /> We did not have a Marks and Sparks<br /> We had an M and B<br /> Maggie Tolly had a shop<br /> Where now the Mace you see.<br /> <br /> It was there I bought my first pink blouse<br /> Made of Celanese<br /> And when I washed the blooming thing<br /> It stretched right to my knees.<br /> <br /> McDonalds' had a baker's shop<br /> (It's now a child's boutique)<br /> Oh, those gorgeous butteries<br /> There were really quite unique.<br /> <br /> Rows and rows of fancy cakes<br /> The best you'd ever seen<br /> When you had one in your hand<br /> They knew where you had been.<br /> <br /> Mrs 'Thinkyou' had her shop<br /> Just across the way<br /> She sold bits of this and that<br /> You need from day to day.<br /> <br /> When I went in at pockie time<br /> The last night of December<br /> She gave to me a rotten orange<br /> How I well remember!<br /> <br /> Mrs Macinante<br /> In George Street they did trade<br /> They had a lot of sweeties<br /> Some of them they made.<br /> <br /> When the sun was very hot<br /> They'd melt before your eyes<br /> And when you bought their lucky bags<br /> You'd sure get a surprise.<br /> <br /> I went up to our chemist's shop<br /> When I had a cold<br /> To buy an Askit powder<br /> That's what I was told.<br /> <br /> Instead I bought some 'Birrels'<br /> Ida said was good<br /> And ate them all before I got home<br /> Then didn't want my food.<br /> <br /> Sometimes I went to Dannie<br /> To see what he'd in stock<br /> Not when I was playing<br /> Round about the dock<br /> <br /> He was always very patient<br /> And sometimes very kind<br /> However long I took to choose<br /> He didn't really mind.<br /> <br /> I think of Bakies Granny<br /> At the bottom of the street<br /> When you went in to get a loaf<br /> perhaps a friend you'd meet.<br /> <br /> 'Anything new Maggie?'<br /> I can hear them say<br /> 'Only my loaves, Jessie'<br /> Oh, well that's the way.'<br /> <br /> Poor old Bella Aileen<br /> With her paraffin in a shed<br /> When I went for a bottle full<br /> This is what she said.<br /> <br /> 'Ma it's a whisky bottle<br /> Does your father take a dram?<br /> I never saw that coat before<br /> You're looking awful gran'<br /> <br /> Jack, he had a fish shop<br /> In the middle of the dock<br /> He opened every night<br /> Sharp at five o'clock.<br /> <br /> They went to queue outside <br /> And wait, and wait and wait<br /> But we didn't seem to mind<br /> The chips were really great.<br /> <br /> There was Johnnie with his batteries<br /> To light us up at night<br /> He was a very godly man<br /> He tried to keep me right.<br /> <br /> 'Have you been to Sunday School?'<br /> I can hear him say<br /> 'No, I haven't Johnnie<br /> I've been out to play'<br /> <br /> Now we all have a favourite shop<br /> And mine was by the sea<br /> It was owned by Maggie Gowie<br /> In my memory I still see.<br /> <br /> All those good old fashioned sweeties<br /> In every shape and size<br /> Highland Cream and Row-chow<br /> And great big bulls eyes.<br /> <br /> We don't forget the dear old folks<br /> Who served us Oh so well<br /> We won't forget the little shops<br /> Who in each one did well.<br /> <br /> We won't forget their loyalty<br /> Their kindness and their cheer<br /> They were the ones who made our Avoch<br /> The Avoch we hold so dear.'<br /> <br /> <br /> By Penny Upton, nee, Patience. Monsie, she's called. [laughs]