Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 19/09/2018
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TIOTAL
Pròiseact Eachdraidh Beul-aithris Bhaile Eòghainn - Eppie Buist (6 de 7 )
EXTERNAL ID
EOHP_EPPIE_BUIST_06
ÀITE
Baile Èoghainn
SGÌRE
Inbhir Pheofharain
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS: Sgìre Thighearna
DEIT
1991; 1992
LINN
1990an
CRUTHADAIR
Eppie Buist
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Pròiseact Eachdraidh Beul-aithris Bhaile Eòghainn
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
41130
KEYWORDS
claistinneach
beul-aithris

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'S e earrann fuaim a tha seo, air a togail bho Phròiseact Eachdraidh Bheul-aithriseach Bhaile Eòghainn, pròiseact air a dhèanamh ann an 1991-92 le Adrian Clark. San earrainnn seo tha Eppie Buist a' bruidhinn air an oighreachd aig Ceiteabhal, faisg air Baile Eòghainn.


This place, this house was a wreck. The little house down the bottom was inhabited by - I think Jimmy Anderson was there then, yes he was.

Interviewer: Mmm-hmm.

And Little Katewell was the steading. Actually, the byre of that house, and my mother made it into a very nice house, except she wished she'd put chimneys on it; it looks bare at each end.

Interviewer: Yes.

She only put one at the back for the fire but not to make it look nice and it looks rather naked without a chimney. And she bought the whole thing - it's fifteen acres of very high class arable land, and one, two, two houses on it - twelve hundred pounds. Imagine. Twelve, that was about 1948 or 9, something like that she bought it. And then she let the grazing to somebody called Donnie Cronk (who you wouldn't know, he's dead now and you wouldn't know). Donnie Cronk had one leg and used to go about on a crutch with his sheep - he was marvellous person. And then she made Little Katewell, made the steading into a house and called it Little Katewell, and she used to let it. And some of the people that she let it to, in those days, still come back; they loved it so much.

Interviewer: Do they? Gosh.

They haven't for the last year or two; they may be dead, I don't know, but they used to come. And then she gave it to me when we were only about 10 miles away; it was very easy to come and sort of look at things and say what we wanted, or didn't like, or something, and she gave me the whole thing, the whole estate. And I never said thank you half enough, I always regret. My mother died and I don't think I ever thanked her enough for giving me this lovely place.

Interviewer: Yes.

You feel like that afterwards; you should have done something. 'Left undone the things we ought to have done and done the things we ought not to have done' it's very true.

Interviewer: Yes.

But it's been the greatest joy to me because the children were small here, and - not very small; they were small at Aultbea, but not very small here - and I think they were passed school age. Yes, they were. They were, they'd gone to school from the other place, from Larchwood they went to school and - So they didn't do it here but what fun we had. When we came here to live we found that our headmaster from the Black Isle was now the headmaster here. So that was an enormous joy but they were grown up by then.

Interviewer: So your children went to local schools?

Mr Mathieson, you know?

Interviewer: Yes.

He was our headmaster - I didn't tell you that bit; after we left Aultbea we went to the Black Isle and then they both went to school in Munlochy, and he was the headmaster. Of course, they weren't in his class, they were juniors.

Interviewer: Yes. I met Mr Mathieson...

But he's a dear man and a lovely, lovely headmaster.

Interviewer: Yes. I met him just last week.

He was so good with children, I mean, he had wonderful discipline.

Interviewer: Yes.

But they all loved him and they brought their dollies and their trains and things, you know, to show him, and he was a real father figure at the school.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Pròiseact Eachdraidh Beul-aithris Bhaile Eòghainn - Eppie Buist (6 de 7 )

ROS: Sgìre Thighearna

1990an

claistinneach; beul-aithris;

Pròiseact Eachdraidh Beul-aithris Bhaile Eòghainn

Evanton Oral History Project

'S e earrann fuaim a tha seo, air a togail bho Phròiseact Eachdraidh Bheul-aithriseach Bhaile Eòghainn, pròiseact air a dhèanamh ann an 1991-92 le Adrian Clark. San earrainnn seo tha Eppie Buist a' bruidhinn air an oighreachd aig Ceiteabhal, faisg air Baile Eòghainn.<br /> <br /> <br /> This place, this house was a wreck. The little house down the bottom was inhabited by - I think Jimmy Anderson was there then, yes he was.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Mmm-hmm.<br /> <br /> And Little Katewell was the steading. Actually, the byre of that house, and my mother made it into a very nice house, except she wished she'd put chimneys on it; it looks bare at each end.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> She only put one at the back for the fire but not to make it look nice and it looks rather naked without a chimney. And she bought the whole thing - it's fifteen acres of very high class arable land, and one, two, two houses on it - twelve hundred pounds. Imagine. Twelve, that was about 1948 or 9, something like that she bought it. And then she let the grazing to somebody called Donnie Cronk (who you wouldn't know, he's dead now and you wouldn't know). Donnie Cronk had one leg and used to go about on a crutch with his sheep - he was marvellous person. And then she made Little Katewell, made the steading into a house and called it Little Katewell, and she used to let it. And some of the people that she let it to, in those days, still come back; they loved it so much.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Do they? Gosh.<br /> <br /> They haven't for the last year or two; they may be dead, I don't know, but they used to come. And then she gave it to me when we were only about 10 miles away; it was very easy to come and sort of look at things and say what we wanted, or didn't like, or something, and she gave me the whole thing, the whole estate. And I never said thank you half enough, I always regret. My mother died and I don't think I ever thanked her enough for giving me this lovely place.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> You feel like that afterwards; you should have done something. 'Left undone the things we ought to have done and done the things we ought not to have done' it's very true.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> But it's been the greatest joy to me because the children were small here, and - not very small; they were small at Aultbea, but not very small here - and I think they were passed school age. Yes, they were. They were, they'd gone to school from the other place, from Larchwood they went to school and - So they didn't do it here but what fun we had. When we came here to live we found that our headmaster from the Black Isle was now the headmaster here. So that was an enormous joy but they were grown up by then.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: So your children went to local schools?<br /> <br /> Mr Mathieson, you know?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> He was our headmaster - I didn't tell you that bit; after we left Aultbea we went to the Black Isle and then they both went to school in Munlochy, and he was the headmaster. Of course, they weren't in his class, they were juniors.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes. I met Mr Mathieson...<br /> <br /> But he's a dear man and a lovely, lovely headmaster.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes. I met him just last week.<br /> <br /> He was so good with children, I mean, he had wonderful discipline.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> But they all loved him and they brought their dollies and their trains and things, you know, to show him, and he was a real father figure at the school.