Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 27/11/2018
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TIOTAL
Cuimhneachaidhean aig Pìleat Spitfire (1 de 10)
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_JOHN_NIVEN_01
ÀITE
Dùn Èideann
DEIT
1986
LINN
1980an
CRUTHADAIR
John Niven
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Rèidio Linne Mhoireibh
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
41164
KEYWORDS
luchd-iùil adhair
plèanaichean
an Dara Cogadh

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San earrann èisteachd seo on phrògram aig Rèidio Moray Firth 'Marshall a' Coinneachadh', tha Sam Marshall a' bruidhinn ri Iain Niven a bha na phìleat ann an Spitfire.

'Interviewer: How did you get involved with the Spitfire?

The, I think the usual schoolboy's approach via Biggles, and the 'Adventure', and the 'Rover', and boys' comics, and then seeing the 603 City of Edinburgh Squadron who were stationed at Turnhouse, first of all flying their Hawker Hinds/Hawker Harts sometimes even a Hawker Fury, and then finally being equipped in 1936 with Spitfires - one of the first squadrons to be equipped with Spitfires. And then, of course, the, it became fairly clear that there was going to be a war anyway. By 1938 it was quite patently obvious there was going to be a war and I tried to join the Auxilliary Air Force myself and I was too young though. But I did join the Edinburgh branch of the Volunteer Reserve which was rather similar to the Auxilliaries in that we flew at the weekends from Grangemouth, just outside Edinburgh.

Interviewer: Was it easy to get into those squadrons or units? I mean, you've made it sound very easy - just thought you would like to be a pilot and you joined up, but was it hard?

No, it wasn't really very hard. I think if you showed the right degree of keenness and if you had the necessary schooling background, the necessary Highers, I think it was really quite simple, but you had, really had to show that you really wanted to, wanted to fly.

Interviewer: How did they select you for aircrew material because not everyone would be suitable presumably?

It was just, it was a series of interviews and a fair stiff medical, and that was it. It was just as simple as that.

Interviewer: There was no intelligence or aptitude testing or anything?

Not at that time. No.

Interviewer: So where did you go first when you joined up?

Well, when the war broke out, of course, we were called up immediately into full time service. I was - after spending quite some time in Edinburgh we went down to Hastings on the south coast to an initial training wing, and we spent many months there marching up and down doing drill and cross country runs and route marches and fairly boring business, until I was fortunate enough to be sent across to Rhodesia to the New Empire Flying Training Scheme that had started there.

Interviewer: How did your feel about going abroad to learn to fly?

Well, there was the feeling of perhaps you're going to miss something by going abroad because, quite clearly, by that time things were boiling up - Dunkirk was imminent. And it was, it seemed that we were going to take a bit of a hammering in France, but it was very exciting to be able to go out to a foreign country in those days, and as it turned out it was a most enjoyable experience.

Interviewer: What did you learn to fly in?

We started off in Tiger Moths and then after the initial training we went on to Harvards - Harvard II's - an American plane with a radial engine, and one or two fairly nasty habits, one of which was a tendency to drop a wing when you came in to land, but we managed to get past that alright and I returned to this country in January 1941.

Interviewer: Did you go straight on to flying Spitfires then?

Yes, I went to an operational training unit at Harden [?] near Speke in Liverpool and did the conversion on to spitfires there.

Interviewer: When you first saw the Spitfire, which was the plane you'd almost joined up to fly, how did it feel?

Slightly awestruck, I think, to begin with, but a very nice feeling too; it was a friendly machine, a friendly aeroplane, and such a nice looking aeroplane, and a nice aeroplane to handle too. And it, I think everybody had the same, the same experience. I think they took to it straightaway.'


Rugadh is thogadh Iain Brown Niven ann an Dùn Èideann. An dèidh fhoghlam aig sgoil Sheòrais Heriot, chaidh e a-steach do ghnothachas an teaghlaich ag obair air mullaichean thogalaichean, Iain Low, Sglèatairean. B' e sgiathalaich, ge ta, a dheagh mhiann bho òige, agus aig aois naodh-deug san Òg-mhios 1939, chuir e a-steach ainm gu soirbheachail do Shaor-thoilichean Glèidhte an RAF (Volunteer Reserve). Chuir e steach airson Colaiste Feachd an Adhair ann an Cranwell agus fhuair e ann, ach mum b' urrainn dha tòiseachadh, chaidh èigheachd air san t-Sultain seirbheis a dhèanamh sa chogadh.

Tro bhliadhnachan a' chogaidh rinn e seirbheis chliùiteach san RAF, a' sgiathalaich Spitfires san RA, sna h-Innseachan agus ann an Iapan. B' e Ceannard a' Scuadrain ann an Scuadran 602 Baile-mòr Ghlaschu agus ann an Scuadran 485 Shealain Ùir. Bha e cuideachd a' sgiathalaich le 322 Scuadran Duitseach. Choisinn e an DFC (Crois na Sgiathalaich Cliùitich) le crann-tarsainn airson a dhìchill mhisneachail. (Tha crann-tarsainn air a chur ri ribean an DFC airson luchd-coisnidh a tha a' faighinn an dàrna duais.)

Às dèidh a' chogaidh chaidh Iain a-steach air ais do ghnothachas mhullaichean an teaghlaich, phòs e Dorothy Hood agus bha triùir chlann aca. Ghluais e a dh'Inbhir Theòrsa airson obair a dhèanamh ann an roinn na luchd-obrach aig UKAEA (Ùghdarras Lùth Atomaigeach na Rìoghachd Aonaichte) ann an Dùn Rath, mus deach e mu dheireadh a dh'fhuireach ann an Inbhir Nis na fhear-obrach aig an HIDB (Bòrd Leasachaidh na Gàidhealtachd 's nan Eilean).

Bha Iain fìor dhèidheil air goilf (chluich e bho bhacadh de 2) agus sna 1960an bha e na mheadhan air ath-ùrachadh is leudachadh a' chùrsa aig a' Mheaghrath faisg air Inbhir Theòrsa. Leig e dheth a dhreuchd ann an 1985 agus bhàsaich e san Dàmhair 1986. Tha a bhean, a mhac agus a dhithis nighean fhathast a' fuireach ann an Inbhir Nis 's an Inbhir Narann.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Cuimhneachaidhean aig Pìleat Spitfire (1 de 10)

1980an

luchd-iùil adhair; plèanaichean; an Dara Cogadh

Rèidio Linne Mhoireibh

MFR: Memories of a Spitfire Pilot

San earrann èisteachd seo on phrògram aig Rèidio Moray Firth 'Marshall a' Coinneachadh', tha Sam Marshall a' bruidhinn ri Iain Niven a bha na phìleat ann an Spitfire.<br /> <br /> 'Interviewer: How did you get involved with the Spitfire?<br /> <br /> The, I think the usual schoolboy's approach via Biggles, and the 'Adventure', and the 'Rover', and boys' comics, and then seeing the 603 City of Edinburgh Squadron who were stationed at Turnhouse, first of all flying their Hawker Hinds/Hawker Harts sometimes even a Hawker Fury, and then finally being equipped in 1936 with Spitfires - one of the first squadrons to be equipped with Spitfires. And then, of course, the, it became fairly clear that there was going to be a war anyway. By 1938 it was quite patently obvious there was going to be a war and I tried to join the Auxilliary Air Force myself and I was too young though. But I did join the Edinburgh branch of the Volunteer Reserve which was rather similar to the Auxilliaries in that we flew at the weekends from Grangemouth, just outside Edinburgh.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Was it easy to get into those squadrons or units? I mean, you've made it sound very easy - just thought you would like to be a pilot and you joined up, but was it hard?<br /> <br /> No, it wasn't really very hard. I think if you showed the right degree of keenness and if you had the necessary schooling background, the necessary Highers, I think it was really quite simple, but you had, really had to show that you really wanted to, wanted to fly.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: How did they select you for aircrew material because not everyone would be suitable presumably?<br /> <br /> It was just, it was a series of interviews and a fair stiff medical, and that was it. It was just as simple as that.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: There was no intelligence or aptitude testing or anything?<br /> <br /> Not at that time. No.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: So where did you go first when you joined up?<br /> <br /> Well, when the war broke out, of course, we were called up immediately into full time service. I was - after spending quite some time in Edinburgh we went down to Hastings on the south coast to an initial training wing, and we spent many months there marching up and down doing drill and cross country runs and route marches and fairly boring business, until I was fortunate enough to be sent across to Rhodesia to the New Empire Flying Training Scheme that had started there.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: How did your feel about going abroad to learn to fly?<br /> <br /> Well, there was the feeling of perhaps you're going to miss something by going abroad because, quite clearly, by that time things were boiling up - Dunkirk was imminent. And it was, it seemed that we were going to take a bit of a hammering in France, but it was very exciting to be able to go out to a foreign country in those days, and as it turned out it was a most enjoyable experience. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: What did you learn to fly in?<br /> <br /> We started off in Tiger Moths and then after the initial training we went on to Harvards - Harvard II's - an American plane with a radial engine, and one or two fairly nasty habits, one of which was a tendency to drop a wing when you came in to land, but we managed to get past that alright and I returned to this country in January 1941. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did you go straight on to flying Spitfires then?<br /> <br /> Yes, I went to an operational training unit at Harden [?] near Speke in Liverpool and did the conversion on to spitfires there.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: When you first saw the Spitfire, which was the plane you'd almost joined up to fly, how did it feel?<br /> <br /> Slightly awestruck, I think, to begin with, but a very nice feeling too; it was a friendly machine, a friendly aeroplane, and such a nice looking aeroplane, and a nice aeroplane to handle too. And it, I think everybody had the same, the same experience. I think they took to it straightaway.'<br /> <br /> <br /> Rugadh is thogadh Iain Brown Niven ann an Dùn Èideann. An dèidh fhoghlam aig sgoil Sheòrais Heriot, chaidh e a-steach do ghnothachas an teaghlaich ag obair air mullaichean thogalaichean, Iain Low, Sglèatairean. B' e sgiathalaich, ge ta, a dheagh mhiann bho òige, agus aig aois naodh-deug san Òg-mhios 1939, chuir e a-steach ainm gu soirbheachail do Shaor-thoilichean Glèidhte an RAF (Volunteer Reserve). Chuir e steach airson Colaiste Feachd an Adhair ann an Cranwell agus fhuair e ann, ach mum b' urrainn dha tòiseachadh, chaidh èigheachd air san t-Sultain seirbheis a dhèanamh sa chogadh. <br /> <br /> Tro bhliadhnachan a' chogaidh rinn e seirbheis chliùiteach san RAF, a' sgiathalaich Spitfires san RA, sna h-Innseachan agus ann an Iapan. B' e Ceannard a' Scuadrain ann an Scuadran 602 Baile-mòr Ghlaschu agus ann an Scuadran 485 Shealain Ùir. Bha e cuideachd a' sgiathalaich le 322 Scuadran Duitseach. Choisinn e an DFC (Crois na Sgiathalaich Cliùitich) le crann-tarsainn airson a dhìchill mhisneachail. (Tha crann-tarsainn air a chur ri ribean an DFC airson luchd-coisnidh a tha a' faighinn an dàrna duais.) <br /> <br /> Às dèidh a' chogaidh chaidh Iain a-steach air ais do ghnothachas mhullaichean an teaghlaich, phòs e Dorothy Hood agus bha triùir chlann aca. Ghluais e a dh'Inbhir Theòrsa airson obair a dhèanamh ann an roinn na luchd-obrach aig UKAEA (Ùghdarras Lùth Atomaigeach na Rìoghachd Aonaichte) ann an Dùn Rath, mus deach e mu dheireadh a dh'fhuireach ann an Inbhir Nis na fhear-obrach aig an HIDB (Bòrd Leasachaidh na Gàidhealtachd 's nan Eilean). <br /> <br /> Bha Iain fìor dhèidheil air goilf (chluich e bho bhacadh de 2) agus sna 1960an bha e na mheadhan air ath-ùrachadh is leudachadh a' chùrsa aig a' Mheaghrath faisg air Inbhir Theòrsa. Leig e dheth a dhreuchd ann an 1985 agus bhàsaich e san Dàmhair 1986. Tha a bhean, a mhac agus a dhithis nighean fhathast a' fuireach ann an Inbhir Nis 's an Inbhir Narann.