Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 21/09/2017
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TIOTAL
Beatha Tuathanais air Oighreachd a' Mhorfhaich (5 de 20)
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_COLIN_MACRAE_05
ÀITE
Baile Ùisdein
SGÌRE
An Àird
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
INBHIR NIS: Cill Taraghlain 's Confhadhach
DEIT
9 Am Màrt 1982
LINN
1980an
CRUTHADAIR
Colin Macrae
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Taigh-tasgaidh Dualchas na Gàidhealtachd
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
41211
KEYWORDS
claistinneach
oighreachdan
lotaichean

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Rugadh is thogadh Cailean MacRath air Oighreachd Lòbhat aig Baile Ùisdein (Hughton), Eilean Aigeas, faisg air a' Mhanachainn. Bha a theaghlach nan tuathanaich aig Oighreachd Lòbhat.

San earrainn chlaistinnich seo tha Cailean a' bruidhinn mu bhuill teaghlaich, connadh, solais, stòras uisge agus làithean nigheadaireachd.

Interviewer: How many of you lived in the house? Was there plenty of room for you all?

Colin: Oh yes, yes, well we, well, there was my father and mother right, and then there was four, four of us, the family, and then we had, for a while, we had two cousins staying with us from, who came from America when there mother died. And then my mother always kept a maid in the house and a man for working the land, you see - a lad as we called him, you see?

Interviewer: What did you use for fuel?

Colin: Oh, just firewood - just firewood as you'd get around about you know? Birch trees or any dead trees round about. You weren't allowed to cut trees in the estates forest, you know, but sometimes if the, you approached the estate, and they would go through the forest, and any trees which were dead, of no, no, no value, they would cut them and charge a small fee, I think, for them sometimes. It was just a nominal sum, you know; they would come and cut them. But it's no doubt a lot took the law into their own hands and helped themselves, and they had to be very fly about it; they would clear up all the sawdust and blacken the stump of the tree and cover it with moss so that it would - The gamekeeper, he always was round about and he was responsible for keeping his eye on things like that, you know? But, of course, if the gamekeeper called in the house on his rounds and had a cup of tea and a dram he turned very blind, you know?

Interviewer: What did you use for lighting?

Colin: Well, we had - oh, just paraffin lamps and candles, of course, that was it.

Interviewer: And where did you get the water from?

Colin: Well there was a - there was just a little stream which ran past the house, you know, but as I said before, it went dry in the summer, so we had to go down near the, we had to go down about three quarters of a mile, there was a well, a very good well which never went dry, and we used to just cart the water up there for the - that was for the cooking purposes. There was a pond at the back of the house which we used to use for driving the thrashing machine; the thrashing machine we had was driven by water power. Well, we could use that perhaps that water for washing or things like this but never for, never used it for cooking or drinking, or anything like that. At Hughton itself, there was a pump there which was sort of a communal thing and you could go there for water but it was never - we never liked it. It wasn't very good. It was falling into disrepair and the well itself was - you know, there was some troughs round the [bit?] and water from the midden thing would be running into it so we never cared to use it much anyway.

Interviewer: Can you tell me about the washday?

Colin: Oh well yes, especially on the - in the spring time, you know, when there was the big blitz, you know, if you went - we used to go down to the riverside before we went to school and eh, with the big iron barrel, and gather sticks and have it, have it boiling and then we took all the, took all the washing down to the riverside and probably took their - something down for a bit lunch and you spent the whole day at the riverside. I always, I always remember, it was one of the days I hated - a washday - because when you'd come home from school, there was never any sign of food in the house. They'd spent all the day at the river washing you see, that was - I didn't like that at all, at all.

(Ìomhaigh - © Stanley Howe. Tha an obair seo air a ceadachadh leis an Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 License.)

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Beatha Tuathanais air Oighreachd a' Mhorfhaich (5 de 20)

INBHIR NIS: Cill Taraghlain 's Confhadhach

1980an

claistinneach; oighreachdan; lotaichean;

Taigh-tasgaidh Dualchas na Gàidhealtachd

Highland Folk Museum: Farming at Eilean Aigas

Rugadh is thogadh Cailean MacRath air Oighreachd Lòbhat aig Baile Ùisdein (Hughton), Eilean Aigeas, faisg air a' Mhanachainn. Bha a theaghlach nan tuathanaich aig Oighreachd Lòbhat.<br /> <br /> San earrainn chlaistinnich seo tha Cailean a' bruidhinn mu bhuill teaghlaich, connadh, solais, stòras uisge agus làithean nigheadaireachd.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: How many of you lived in the house? Was there plenty of room for you all?<br /> <br /> Colin: Oh yes, yes, well we, well, there was my father and mother right, and then there was four, four of us, the family, and then we had, for a while, we had two cousins staying with us from, who came from America when there mother died. And then my mother always kept a maid in the house and a man for working the land, you see - a lad as we called him, you see?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What did you use for fuel?<br /> <br /> Colin: Oh, just firewood - just firewood as you'd get around about you know? Birch trees or any dead trees round about. You weren't allowed to cut trees in the estates forest, you know, but sometimes if the, you approached the estate, and they would go through the forest, and any trees which were dead, of no, no, no value, they would cut them and charge a small fee, I think, for them sometimes. It was just a nominal sum, you know; they would come and cut them. But it's no doubt a lot took the law into their own hands and helped themselves, and they had to be very fly about it; they would clear up all the sawdust and blacken the stump of the tree and cover it with moss so that it would - The gamekeeper, he always was round about and he was responsible for keeping his eye on things like that, you know? But, of course, if the gamekeeper called in the house on his rounds and had a cup of tea and a dram he turned very blind, you know?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What did you use for lighting?<br /> <br /> Colin: Well, we had - oh, just paraffin lamps and candles, of course, that was it.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And where did you get the water from?<br /> <br /> Colin: Well there was a - there was just a little stream which ran past the house, you know, but as I said before, it went dry in the summer, so we had to go down near the, we had to go down about three quarters of a mile, there was a well, a very good well which never went dry, and we used to just cart the water up there for the - that was for the cooking purposes. There was a pond at the back of the house which we used to use for driving the thrashing machine; the thrashing machine we had was driven by water power. Well, we could use that perhaps that water for washing or things like this but never for, never used it for cooking or drinking, or anything like that. At Hughton itself, there was a pump there which was sort of a communal thing and you could go there for water but it was never - we never liked it. It wasn't very good. It was falling into disrepair and the well itself was - you know, there was some troughs round the [bit?] and water from the midden thing would be running into it so we never cared to use it much anyway.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Can you tell me about the washday?<br /> <br /> Colin: Oh well yes, especially on the - in the spring time, you know, when there was the big blitz, you know, if you went - we used to go down to the riverside before we went to school and eh, with the big iron barrel, and gather sticks and have it, have it boiling and then we took all the, took all the washing down to the riverside and probably took their - something down for a bit lunch and you spent the whole day at the riverside. I always, I always remember, it was one of the days I hated - a washday - because when you'd come home from school, there was never any sign of food in the house. They'd spent all the day at the river washing you see, that was - I didn't like that at all, at all.<br /> <br /> (Ìomhaigh - © Stanley Howe. Tha an obair seo air a ceadachadh leis an Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 License.)