Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 14/07/2017
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TIOTAL
Beatha air Oighreachd Fhòlais, Cill Tighearna (12 de 16)
EXTERNAL ID
EOHP_FOULIS_ESTATE_12
ÀITE
Fòghlais
SGÌRE
Inbhir Pheofharain
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS: Sgìre Thighearna
DEIT
1991; 1992
LINN
1990an
CRUTHADAIR
Marianne Chamier & Joan Paton
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Pròiseact Eachdraidh Beul-aithris Bhaile Eòghainn
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
80
KEYWORDS
claistinneach
oighreachdan
Clann Rothach
Rothach Fòghlais

Get Adobe Flash player

'S e earrann fuaim a tha seo, air a togail bho Phròiseact Eachdraidh Bheul-aithriseach Bhaile Eòghainn, pròiseact air a dhèanamh ann an 1991-92 le Adrian Clark.

San earrainn seo tha na peathraichean Marianne Chamier agus Seonag Pheutan (a rugadh Gascoigne) a' bruidhinn air beatha aig Caisteal Fòghlais aig àm an Dàrna Cogaidh. Fhuair an teaghlach cothrom air seirbheisean Nighean Fearainn air sgàth 's gu robh leas ghlasraich meadhanach mòr aig Fòghlas. Bha cuideachd prìosanaich-cogaidh Eadailteach air am fasdadh aig Fòghlas rè 'n Chogadh.

Marianne: Petrol, of course, was maddening. Never could get enough petrol to do anything. We were allowed, a little, I think, because we were what, four, five miles from Dingwall. But there was a good many vans still in those days going round with groceries and bread and that sort of thing. In fact, the bread came by a horse trap. When rationing came into being the old boy who'd always delivered the bread for years and years and years, and I think he must have been seventy plus, had nothing to do with bread rationing. He used to throw them away on the road. Handfuls of them he used to throw away. How they continued to make bread I don't know because I imagine the tickets they threw away were all - flour had to have come from it.

Interviewer: You were looking after the family in -

Joan. Yes. Mmmm. And there were four kids - two of mine and two of my sister's - and we had two little boys staying whose father and mother were in London and wanted them out of London, for the bombing and that sort of thing, and so we then got a governess to teach them all because he hadn't got any petrol for getting them backwards and forwards to Evanton, to school.

Interviewer: Yes.

Marianne: There's no way you could do it. I don't think we had very much trouble about rationing, really, up here. It wasn't nearly so bad as it was in the south.

Interviewer: And did you grow a lot of your own vegetables?

Marianne: Yes. Well, we were very lucky. We had a gardener there and he was left with us quite a long time and then he had to go, and we were allowed to have a land girl, because it was a big garden and because we started to - people, you know, really - sold it if people wanted they could come and get cabbages and this and that - and so we were very lucky to get a land girl.

Interviewer: And where did she come from?

Marianne: She came from Edinburgh. Nice girl.

Interviewer: Did she stay with you?

Marianne: She - no. There was a - just outside the lodge back door there was a little room that was made in the old days for the menservants - when the people came up to shoot and they brought butlers and footmen and this and that with them. They built a little house; my grandfather built a little house, for all the menservants. And that was turned into a little cottage by my mother - she put in a stove in one of the rooms, you know, and bedroom, and so on, and the land girl lived there. And [she] used to some into the house for meals. And then, of course, we also could get Italian prisoners of war and they were great fun. We used to enjoy them, like anything.

Interviewer: Yes.

Marianne: They were splendid with the kids; the kids were all little, you know?

Interviewer: Yes.

Marianne: And they all loved my mother; they used to call her 'Granny', always known as 'Granny'. And, poor chaps, you would have felt very sorry for them, you know? They'd come from, sort of, country places. They would - I don't suppose most of them knew how to read or write. They were the most, gentle creatures.

Interviewer: Yes.

Marianne: They were at Brahan at the time and they used to come in a lorry every day and clamber off and you were told -

Interviewer: From eh?

Marianne: From Brahan.

Interviewer: Brahan.

Marianne: They were, they were billeted there. They were quite helpful.

Interviewer: And did they speak any English or did you teach them?

Marianne: Sort of, smattering.

Interviewers: Yes.

Marianne: Smattering.

Interviewer: Did they have anybody controlling them while you were there? Or you were responsible for doing that?

Marianne: No, they just used to be dropped off. Yes..

Interviewer: Yes, and collected in the evening.

Marianne: I suppose they could have escaped with the greatest of ease but I think the poor things had - I don't know where on earth they would have gone.

Interviewer: Yes. So you only had Italians, not German soldiers?

Marianne: No, I don't remember having any Germans. And, of course, we still, I think we still had the gardener, Jimmy Campbell. I think he was still there with the Italians. He used to just sort them out and give them plenty work to do.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
Powered by Capture

Beatha air Oighreachd Fhòlais, Cill Tighearna (12 de 16)

ROS: Sgìre Thighearna

1990an

claistinneach; oighreachdan; Clann Rothach; Rothach Fòghlais

Pròiseact Eachdraidh Beul-aithris Bhaile Eòghainn

Evanton Oral History Project

'S e earrann fuaim a tha seo, air a togail bho Phròiseact Eachdraidh Bheul-aithriseach Bhaile Eòghainn, pròiseact air a dhèanamh ann an 1991-92 le Adrian Clark.<br /> <br /> San earrainn seo tha na peathraichean Marianne Chamier agus Seonag Pheutan (a rugadh Gascoigne) a' bruidhinn air beatha aig Caisteal Fòghlais aig àm an Dàrna Cogaidh. Fhuair an teaghlach cothrom air seirbheisean Nighean Fearainn air sgàth 's gu robh leas ghlasraich meadhanach mòr aig Fòghlas. Bha cuideachd prìosanaich-cogaidh Eadailteach air am fasdadh aig Fòghlas rè 'n Chogadh.<br /> <br /> Marianne: Petrol, of course, was maddening. Never could get enough petrol to do anything. We were allowed, a little, I think, because we were what, four, five miles from Dingwall. But there was a good many vans still in those days going round with groceries and bread and that sort of thing. In fact, the bread came by a horse trap. When rationing came into being the old boy who'd always delivered the bread for years and years and years, and I think he must have been seventy plus, had nothing to do with bread rationing. He used to throw them away on the road. Handfuls of them he used to throw away. How they continued to make bread I don't know because I imagine the tickets they threw away were all - flour had to have come from it.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: You were looking after the family in - <br /> <br /> Joan. Yes. Mmmm. And there were four kids - two of mine and two of my sister's - and we had two little boys staying whose father and mother were in London and wanted them out of London, for the bombing and that sort of thing, and so we then got a governess to teach them all because he hadn't got any petrol for getting them backwards and forwards to Evanton, to school.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> Marianne: There's no way you could do it. I don't think we had very much trouble about rationing, really, up here. It wasn't nearly so bad as it was in the south.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And did you grow a lot of your own vegetables?<br /> <br /> Marianne: Yes. Well, we were very lucky. We had a gardener there and he was left with us quite a long time and then he had to go, and we were allowed to have a land girl, because it was a big garden and because we started to - people, you know, really - sold it if people wanted they could come and get cabbages and this and that - and so we were very lucky to get a land girl.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And where did she come from?<br /> <br /> Marianne: She came from Edinburgh. Nice girl.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did she stay with you?<br /> <br /> Marianne: She - no. There was a - just outside the lodge back door there was a little room that was made in the old days for the menservants - when the people came up to shoot and they brought butlers and footmen and this and that with them. They built a little house; my grandfather built a little house, for all the menservants. And that was turned into a little cottage by my mother - she put in a stove in one of the rooms, you know, and bedroom, and so on, and the land girl lived there. And [she] used to some into the house for meals. And then, of course, we also could get Italian prisoners of war and they were great fun. We used to enjoy them, like anything. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> Marianne: They were splendid with the kids; the kids were all little, you know?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> Marianne: And they all loved my mother; they used to call her 'Granny', always known as 'Granny'. And, poor chaps, you would have felt very sorry for them, you know? They'd come from, sort of, country places. They would - I don't suppose most of them knew how to read or write. They were the most, gentle creatures.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> Marianne: They were at Brahan at the time and they used to come in a lorry every day and clamber off and you were told - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: From eh?<br /> <br /> Marianne: From Brahan.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Brahan.<br /> <br /> Marianne: They were, they were billeted there. They were quite helpful.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And did they speak any English or did you teach them?<br /> <br /> Marianne: Sort of, smattering.<br /> <br /> Interviewers: Yes.<br /> <br /> Marianne: Smattering.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did they have anybody controlling them while you were there? Or you were responsible for doing that?<br /> <br /> Marianne: No, they just used to be dropped off. Yes..<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes, and collected in the evening.<br /> <br /> Marianne: I suppose they could have escaped with the greatest of ease but I think the poor things had - I don't know where on earth they would have gone.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes. So you only had Italians, not German soldiers?<br /> <br /> Marianne: No, I don't remember having any Germans. And, of course, we still, I think we still had the gardener, Jimmy Campbell. I think he was still there with the Italians. He used to just sort them out and give them plenty work to do.