Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 19/01/2017
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National Savings Certificates Holder's Card

This image shows a National Savings Certificates holder's card, dated from 1944. The signature shows it to be the property of Mr J. Gordon and recorded on the card is the information that he is currently a prisoner in Japanese hands. The holder's card is required to be produced on seeking repayment for savings certificates at Post Offices or appointed traders.

Founded in 1881 as the Post Office Savings bank and supported by the Government, National Savings had a dual purpose. Set up to encourage British people to save more, invested funds could then be borrowed by the Chancellor to be put towards public funding.

In 1916, the scheme was expanded to increase funds for the war effort and by 1956, premium bonds had been introduced. The initiative has changed name over the years and is in existence today as National Savings & Investments, still supported by the Government.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Cairt Neach-gleidhidh Theisteanasan caomhnaidh Nàiseanta

tasgadh; bancaichean; teisteanasan caomhnaidh Nàiseanta; Banca Tasgaidh Oifis a' Phuist; bannan tàillibh; Tasgaidhean & Caomhnadh Nàiseanta

W Gordon

Winnie Gordon (documents)

This image shows a National Savings Certificates holder's card, dated from 1944. The signature shows it to be the property of Mr J. Gordon and recorded on the card is the information that he is currently a prisoner in Japanese hands. The holder's card is required to be produced on seeking repayment for savings certificates at Post Offices or appointed traders.<br /> <br /> Founded in 1881 as the Post Office Savings bank and supported by the Government, National Savings had a dual purpose. Set up to encourage British people to save more, invested funds could then be borrowed by the Chancellor to be put towards public funding.<br /> <br /> In 1916, the scheme was expanded to increase funds for the war effort and by 1956, premium bonds had been introduced. The initiative has changed name over the years and is in existence today as National Savings & Investments, still supported by the Government.