Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 20/05/2019
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TIOTAL
The Square, Grantown on Spey
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GM2_PHOTOGRAPHS_034
ÀITE
Grantown on Spey
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
MOIREIBH: Crombail, Inbhir Ailein 's Àbhaidh
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Grantown Museum
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
22792
KEYWORDS
villages
roads
vehicles
The Square, Grantown on Spey

A photograph of the Square in Grantown on Spey after a fall of snow.

Located approximately 32 km southeast of Inverness, Grantown is a planned village, established in 1765 by the local landowner, Sir James Grant.

Grantown is one of approximately 150 planned villages that were established in Scotland between 1750 and 1850. Agricultural improvements that took place during the 18th century, especially the enclosure of farmland, meant that far fewer people were needed to work the land. This led to much social disruption, and many landowners in Scotland created planned villages as a way of promoting trade and industry in their area, and as a means of providing employment to those who had been forced to leave the land.

Sir James Grant laid out Grantown around a large, central square on a site that was well served by two military roads. Leases for building plots were put up for sale in 1765, and Sir James placed an advert in the 'Aberdeen Journal' stating that he would give "Feus or long leases, and all proper encouragement to Manufacturers, Tradesmen, or others, sufficiently recommended and attested, as to Character and Ability, who incline to settle there."

Sir James invested heavily to attract manufacturers of different kinds to Grantown, but by the late 1700s it was clear that these industries were failing to prosper. The settlement found success however as a service centre for the surrounding district, and from the 1860s onwards prospered also from an increase in the number of tourists visiting the area.

This growth in tourism was due in part to the arrival of the railway to Grantown in 1863, which enabled far greater numbers of tourists to visit the settlement. In September 1860 Grantown was also visited by Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, whose purchase of Balmoral in the 1840s had significantly boosted the appeal of the Highlands to the British public.

The historian RN MacMillan has described Grantown as "among the best-preserved and most interesting of all Scottish planned villages". Today, it is still a centre of tourism, and has a population of just over 2,000.


This image may be available to purchase.
For further information about purchasing and prices please email
Grantown Museum

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
Powered by Capture

The Square, Grantown on Spey

MOIREIBH: Crombail, Inbhir Ailein 's Àbhaidh

villages; roads; vehicles

Grantown Museum

Grantown Museum Photographic Collection

A photograph of the Square in Grantown on Spey after a fall of snow.<br /> <br /> Located approximately 32 km southeast of Inverness, Grantown is a planned village, established in 1765 by the local landowner, Sir James Grant.<br /> <br /> Grantown is one of approximately 150 planned villages that were established in Scotland between 1750 and 1850. Agricultural improvements that took place during the 18th century, especially the enclosure of farmland, meant that far fewer people were needed to work the land. This led to much social disruption, and many landowners in Scotland created planned villages as a way of promoting trade and industry in their area, and as a means of providing employment to those who had been forced to leave the land.<br /> <br /> Sir James Grant laid out Grantown around a large, central square on a site that was well served by two military roads. Leases for building plots were put up for sale in 1765, and Sir James placed an advert in the 'Aberdeen Journal' stating that he would give "Feus or long leases, and all proper encouragement to Manufacturers, Tradesmen, or others, sufficiently recommended and attested, as to Character and Ability, who incline to settle there."<br /> <br /> Sir James invested heavily to attract manufacturers of different kinds to Grantown, but by the late 1700s it was clear that these industries were failing to prosper. The settlement found success however as a service centre for the surrounding district, and from the 1860s onwards prospered also from an increase in the number of tourists visiting the area. <br /> <br /> This growth in tourism was due in part to the arrival of the railway to Grantown in 1863, which enabled far greater numbers of tourists to visit the settlement. In September 1860 Grantown was also visited by Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, whose purchase of Balmoral in the 1840s had significantly boosted the appeal of the Highlands to the British public.<br /> <br /> The historian RN MacMillan has described Grantown as "among the best-preserved and most interesting of all Scottish planned villages". Today, it is still a centre of tourism, and has a population of just over 2,000. <br /> <br /> <br /> This image may be available to purchase.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href="mailto: gosmuseum@btconnect.com">Grantown Museum</a>